Leigh Road bears brunt of highway exit closure

Residential block of Langford roadway sees large volume of industrial vehicle traffic

Re: Life is better without the highway (Gazette, Dec. 22)

As a resident of the Langford Lake area, I empathize with the residents of Goldstream Avenue and share in their relief for having safer pedestrian conditions on the road, now that it is closed to exiting highway traffic.

However, do not ignore the trickle-down of this change in traffic patterns: the problem with  volumes has shifted to Leigh Road, which is also residential south of Goldstream Avenue. Many drivers appear to not give this consideration.

The 2800-block of Leigh is flanked on each side by residences. The recent upgrade in this block created a sidewalk on one side, but it lacks crosswalks between Dunford Road and Goldstream and a sidewalk on the opposite side. The speed limit is 50 km/h.

Children walk on the narrow Leigh Road shoulder/bike lane between the road and the curb on their way to and from school. Why? Because it is unsafe to cross the road to reach the sidewalk in this block due to traffic speeds, large vehicles and wide-turning vehicles.

If you can drag yourself away from the circus show that is the intersection of Goldstream and Leigh, walk down the 2800-block of Leigh Road around 8:30 a.m. or during the evening shift change for the transit buses returning to their yard on Dunford. Try crossing the road and consider then how safe you feel.

Perhaps collectively we can make the road safer and quieter for all those living and passing through our residential area?

To the good neighbours from Dunford businesses: slow the trucks and buses down and do not use engine brakes (refer to the posted sign). To guests of our neighbourhood: slow down. To area residents: slow down and complain to businesses and the City of Langford when you see problems. To the RCMP: occasional speed enforcement would be beneficial. To the City: consider dual speed limits for heavy and personal vehicles (such as is used in the U.S.).

The 50 km/h speed limit is too fast for large trucks and buses when mixed with the pedestrians and residences on Leigh. It’s a lethal combination.

Please slow down and consider the safety of our children. Any of us could have a lapse in judgment in our haste to finish our work day, or to get wherever we are going a few seconds faster. We would then have to live with the heart-wrenching consequences of our actions.

Leah Brennan

Langford

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