EDITORIAL: Input needed on cold cases

Public's assistance can be crucial to help police solve crimes

Choosing to avoid a scene or turn a blind eye to someone in need can have consequences.

Just ask the female cyclist who was attacked as she rode her bike near the busy intersection of Jacklin and Jenkins roads around 9 a.m. on Sunday, Aug. 17.

An assailant looking to steal the rider’s backpack hit her in the back of the head, knocked her down on the roadway and stole her expensive mountain bike as well as the backpack.

As of this week, West Shore RCMP said the case has been closed due to a lack of new leads into the investigation.

This was not a simple break-in, or petty theft where the stolen goods are likely long gone. It was an unprovoked, violent assault of a person who was simply going about their business and travelling from point A to point B.

We wonder what the police told this victim when they closed the case. That part of the scenario concerns us.

More troubling is the fact no one with good information connected with the RCMP with what they knew or saw, to the point where a decision was made to shift police resources elsewhere.

Being ignorant to what’s going on around us isn’t necessarily epidemic on the West Shore.

Last month, a man driving a BMW with stolen plates crashed head-on into a van and fled, leaving his badly injured teenage passenger behind. Onlookers gave chase, but the man escaped. Thanks to numerous tips from the public, however, RCMP continue to move forward on the case.

Information gained from the public also helped solve a vicious sexual assault that took place on the Galloping Goose earlier this year.

West Shore RCMP recently asked for help from the public with an investigation into a suspicious dump truck fire from Nov. 1. It’s just the latest example where the police have little to go on, but are expected to do something to bring closure for the victims of a crime.

The public has a role to play in maintaining a safe society. That includes paying attention when someone attempts or succeeds in disrupting ours or others’ sense of safety and security. Sometimes even seemingly insignificant information can make a difference.

For those who are afraid to get involved, information can be given anonymously to Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS or online at victoriacrimestoppers.com. Otherwise, call West Shore RCMP at 250-474-2264.

Do it for your community.

Just Posted

Child care alternatives for the holidays

While schools and a lot of daycare options close for the holidays, not all businesses do

New centres offer play alternatives

New play centre, aerial and acrobats classes being offered on the West Shore

Wheels in motion for new skatepark on the West Shore

New Line Skateparks selected to complete designs

Metchosin Preschool continues to keep co-ops alive

Fundraisers planned to help with repairs

Bird watchers gear up for annual count

Count takes place in Langford, Colwood, Victoria, North and Central Saanich

VIDEO: New series takes in-depth look at sexual harassment in B.C.

Black Press takes a hard look at sexual harassment in B.C.

Horgan says pot smokers may face same outdoor rules as cigarette smokers

B.C. is developing its rules on recreational marijuana

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers naughty list for the week of Dec. 12

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Truck driver volunteers to take dog lost in B.C. back home to Alberta

Frankie, a pit bull service dog, was found wandering in the Lower Mainland

Ladysmith woman who jumped from ferry meets rescuers

A local artist who survived five hours in the frigid waters of… Continue reading

B.C. teacher suspended after explicit images projected to class

Jeffrey Rohin Muthanna had been viewing porn on a school laptop for two years

Man who pledged to give B.C. hockey team millions charged with fraud

Mike Gould has since repaid $8,000 he allegedly owed Cranbrook restaurant, owner says

Strong economy fuels housing sales in B.C.: report

Economist says demand for houses is being supported by a large number of millennials entering the market

Tequila, hammers and knives: what not to bring on an airplane

Vancouver International Airport staff provide tips on travelling during the holidays

Most Read