Six-year old Cassidy Slingsby, who makes her feature film debut as “Chloe” in The Christmas Calendar, sits with her mother Katherine. (Hugo Wong/News Staff)

Keating Elementary student makes feature film debut

A Keating Elementary student has booked her first feature film role. Six-year old Cassidy Slingsby is in The Christmas Calendar, about a big-city lawyer played by Laura Bell Bundy who takes over her late grandmother’s struggling bakery while being wooed by a secret admirer with an advent calendar.

Cassidy plays Chloe, the daughter of one of the leads, played by Vancouver actress Paloma Kwiatkowski.

This is Cassidy’s first feature film, but she has done commercials in the past, appearing in ads for BC Transit, Parks Canada, Bear Mountain Resort, Harbour Air and Butchart Gardens. When she was three, she and her parents were extras on Gracepoint when it was filmed in Oak Bay, but their scenes were cut out of the final episode.

She was on set of this latest project for two full days during the snow of February this year on Fort Street and in a local home.

“She had so many lines, not just lines but actions to memorize, that it was a pretty intense schedule,” said her mother, Katherine.

When she auditioned for the role, the family was in New Zealand visiting Katherine’s sister, and preparing her audition tape was hard because the number of lines required. She told her mother she did not want to do it, but by the next morning she had changed her mind. She nailed it in one take.

Katherine prefers the acting environment on the Island to Vancouver, where she said there is a lot more competition and parents can be a bit “over-aspirational”. Island jobs are smaller with lower pay, but with that comes a lot less pressure, said Katherine. Victoria is a smaller market, so the same crews and directors work on many Island projects and the family has gotten to know them.

When asked what her favourite part of shooting was, Cassidy said: “the candy tray.”

After lunch, craft services has a candy tray for the crew, but a craft services attendant was worried Cassidy wouldn’t get any because she was the only kid on set, so she made a small one just for her.

“After Cassidy forgets everything about this movie she’ll always remember the fabulous candy tray,” said Katherine.

Katherine herself does voiceover work, but her local agent, Barbara Coultish, asked if she wanted a headshot to do commercials, to which she said yes. Coultish learned that Katherine had children, so asked if they were interested in any lifestyle photo shoots as a family, and then “the kids started doing stuff on their own.”

Her eight-year old daughter Harmony was the first actor of the pair, with a speaking role in the Game of Love, a 2016 film with Heather Locklear.

Both girls were asked to audition for the role of Chloe, but Harmony said she did not want to do it, while Cassidy did.

“They’ve said no before [to roles], and I always give them the option because it’s supposed to be fun,” said Katherine.

Cassidy does musical theatre and is learning piano, but she likes typical kid stuff like Lego and riding her bike. It’s a part-time job for Cassidy, but Katherine said she will likely continue to act.

“There’s a passion there that’s pretty cool for a young kid.”

The Christmas Calendar airs on the W Network Nov. 30 at 8 p.m.

reporter@peninsulanewsreview.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Victoria Flamenco Festival goes virtual for 2020 event

The show will go online from July 23 to 26

Metchosin bird card project finds its wings

On display at Metchosin ArtPod from July 10 to 12

UVic research team creating virus-resistant washbasins for post-pandemic world

Civil engineer Rishi Gupta hopes basins will be installed in public spaces

Walk for Peace takes a virtual turn for Victoria Hospice

Residents can still register for Gordy Dodd’s 11th annual fundraiser

United Way Greater Victoria launches Hi Neighbour program in Esquimalt

Feedback sought from residents about funding for micro community projects

B.C. accommodators need phone lines to light up as in-province travel given green light

Travel restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic have decimated the tourism and hospitality industries

300 Cache Creek residents on evacuation alert due to flood risk as river rises

Heavy rainfall on Canada Day has river rising steadily, threatening 175 properties

First glimpse of Canada’s true COVID-19 infection rate expected mid-July

At least 105,000 Canadians have tested positive for COVID-19 since the coronavirus was identified

Annual music event in Comox Valley celebrates online instead

Vancouver Island MusicFest holds virtual celebration set for July 10

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Most Read