A CP Rail train has been hit by an avalanche east of Revelstoke. (CP Rail file photo)

UPDATE: CP Rail line re-opened after avalanche derailment in Glacier National Park

Seven cars derailed

A CP Rail train was derailed due to an avalanche in Glacier National Park.

The incident occurred at 8:30 p.m. Dec. 21.

According to a statement from CP Rail, there were no injuries to the crew.

“Seven intermodal platforms derailed as a result of the avalanche,” said Salem Woodrow, media relations advisor for CP Rail, in an email.

The rail line was re-opened on the evening for Dec. 22 once all track repairs and safety inspections were complete.

Though the incident occurred in a National Park, Parks Canada deferred all comment to CP Rail.

“Parks Canada has been working with CP in Glacier National Park to ensure the safety of response crews‎,” said Shelley Bird, communications officer for Mt. Revelstoke and Glacier National Parks.

The B.C. Ministry of Transportation also deferred a statement to CP Rail, as they do their own avalanche control, said a spokesperson for the ministry.

Transport Canada deferred a statement to the Transportation Safety Board, who said there was no dangerous goods on board the derailed cars and that they were made aware of but will not be investigating the incident as avalanches are out of their purview.


 

@JDoll_Revy
jocelyn.doll@revelstokereview.com

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