Saanich police board members Lori Staples, Irwin Henderson, Tim Kane, Mayor Richard Atwell, Glen Crawford, Bruce Halsor and Mary Collins.

Contract pushes Saanich police board into public spotlight

It has been the recent subject of much scrutiny, but what exactly is the Saanich Police Board?

It governs Saanich’s police department, and entered the public spotlight when it approved changes to the employment status of Chief Constable Bob Downie, Saanich’s top cop. Under the changes, Downie received $378,791 following his retirement on July 31, then immediately returned to his job as a contractor for two years (plus an option year), with an annual salary of about $222,711 plus benefits, vacation, leaves and expense reimbursements.

The arrangement has caused a public outcry, and pushed the board into the public spotlight. An independent and autonomous authority established under the provincial Police Act, it performs both governance and oversight functions.

Its primary role is to “establish overall objectives and priorities for the provision of police services” after consultation with the chief constable, whom it also appoints and assesses. It also manages the department’s budget and handles collective bargaining. The board also possesses investigative powers into “matters concerning policing, law enforcement and crime prevention in the municipality.” These powers also give the police board the power to investigate complaints against the department.

The Police Act also spells out composition and appointment of members, who fall into the three categories: the mayor, who serves as board chair and council liaison; a person appointed by council; and members whom the Lieutenant-Governor appoints through an order-in-council.

Saanich’s police board currently has seven members. Mayor Richard Atwell as chair; council appointee Lori Staples; and Mary Collins, Glen Crawford, Bruce Hallsor, Irwin Henderson and Tim Kane. Two of its members – Staples and Hallsor – hold the designation of Queen’s Counsel, a title reserved for eminent lawyers. Collins retired as the President of the BC Health Association, Crawford works in financial management, Henderson has an extensive background in public administration, while Kane has worked in public relations.

The board stands apart from both Saanich council as well as the provincial government of the day. “This removes police boards from partisan politics and, at the same time, recognizes that both the municipality and the province have legitimate interests in municipal policing,” the board says on its site.

Atwell also stressed the independent nature of the board in a recent interview. The separation between council and the police board is analogous to the separation between church and state to avoid political interference, he said.

This of course does not mean that the two bodies are immune to tensions, as they played out earlier this year when Atwell’s council colleagues sent a letter to the police board to register their disappointment with the handling of Downie’s contract.

While the letter “recognizes and respects” the autonomy of the Police Board to manage the operation and staffing of the Saanich police department, it also appears to question the substance of the contract and its announcement.

“Council is responsible for ensuring Saanich is well governed and transparent in its operations and therefore is disappointed that we were not made aware by the Police Board of the board’s decision regarding changes to the employment status of Chief Downie until the media release was issued,” it reads.

Some might read this language as an attempt by council to pull rank over the police board, a charge that the signatories of the letter deny.

Coun. Fred Haynes, who chaired the in-camera meeting that drafted the letter as acting mayor, said Atwell missed an opportunity to inform council in advance of the arrangement with Downie, explain the rationale behind it, and seek additional input from council.

For someone who campaigned on openness and transparency, Atwell missed an opportunity, said Haynes in an interview earlier this month.

Haynes said the signatories recognize the exclusive domain of the Police Board, when it comes to making personnel decisions, including contracts, which do not require council’s approval.

“That said, council has a responsibility for the overall budget and management of Saanich Police as part of the municipality,” said Haynes.

Just Posted

Friends, family remember Dan Sealey, stepson of Minister of Agriculture, in private gathering

Lana Popham confirmed Sealey died of an accidental drug overdose earlier this month at age 23

Mommy’s Inside Voice: A little piece of you

Mommy’s Inside Voice is a biweekly column by Amie Jay, a local mother of three

High school graduation rates on the rise in Greater Victoria

High school completion up from 71 to 86.8 per cent over 10 years

Pacific Centre Family Services Association a winning design in Colwood

Victoria Real Estate Board winner a welcoming sight

Victoria curling foursome looks to defend provincial title

2019 BC Junior Curling Championships held in Vernon from Dec. 27, 2018 to Jan. 1, 2019

Unique technology gives children with special needs more independent play

UVic’s CanAssist refined seven prototypes aided by $1.5M government contribution

Greater Victoria holiday craft fair roundup for Nov. 16 to 18

Check off all of the items on your shopping list at these great events

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers wanted list for the week of Nov. 14

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

High-end B.C. house prices dropping, but no relief at lower levels

But experts say home ownership remains out of reach for many for middle- and lower-income families

Worker killed in collision at B.C. coal mine

Vehicle collision occurred at approximately 10:45 a.m. this morning

B.C. asking for tips on ‘dirty money’ in horse racing, real estate, luxury cars

Action follows a Peter German report on money laundering in B.C. casinos

Canadian dead more than a week after plane crash in Guyana: Global Affairs

Global Affairs said it couldn’t provide further details on the identity of the Canadian citizen

Children between 6 and 9 eligible for $1,200 RESP grant from province

BC Ministry of Education is reminding residents to apply before the deadline

Privacy concerns over credit card use for legal online pot purchases

Worries follow privacy breaches at some Canadian cannabis retailers

Most Read