Wrangle the waste after the holidays

As the holiday season comes to an end there’s no denying the amount of recycling that seems to accumulate. Whether its gift wrapping, cardboard boxes or just food containers, the blue bins seem to be overflowing by the time the end of December rolls around.

The Capital Regional District’s blue box recycling program provides curbside pickup to more than 121,000 homes in the region. To participate residents must have their recyclables at the curb before 7:30 a.m. on collection day and items must be in at least one CRD blue box or bag to indicate to the truck drivers the materials are intended for pickup.

It’s important to remember that all items accepted in this program are banned from residential garbage.

There is also no limit to the amount of recyclables you may place at the curb, which means you don’t have to feel shy about stacking additional bins at the curb in December or January. Just make sure all the items are permitted and secured so they won’t blow away during windy conditions.

If winter weather makes conditions unsafe for pickup, the CRD asks residents to hold onto recyclables until the next collection date.

RELATED: Recycling didn’t get picked up? You’ll have to wait another two weeks

When you’re putting up or putting away those holiday decorations, don’t forget a number of items (including strings of lights or small appliances) that are not permitted in blue bins can be recycled free of charge at a number of locations across the region. For a full list go to myrecyclopedia.ca to find the location nearest you and what’s accepted.

Some items that are not permitted in blue bins include: hardcover or paperback books, non-paper gift wrap (foil), ribbon or bows, musical greeting cards with batteries, rubber bands, padded envelopes, plastic bags, cardboard boxes with wax coating, paper towels (these can be composted), tissues, juice cartons (return for refund), containers for motor oil or antifreeze, packaging labeled as biodegradable or compostable, shrink wrap, plastic blister packs, ceramic plant pots, spray paint cans, chip or snack bags, and metal toys.

As a way to help protect yourself from identity theft, the CRD recommends shredding or tearing apart all papers containing personal information prior to placing it at the curb. You can also use a dark marker to cover up your personal information. Place shredded materials in a sealed or stapled paper bag, cereal box or other non-corrugated paper product inside your blue bag.

Another tip is to place recyclables at the curb as close as possible to 7:30 a.m. on your collection day. This helps reduce the chances of someone going through your box – and helps prevent items from blowing away.

For more information or to find your pickup schedule, go to bit.ly/2mkKX8p. You can also download an app so you never miss a pickup again.

Find the entire holiday edition of West Shore Family online.


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editor@goldstreamgazette.com

West Shore Family

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