Don’t feed the deer: Wild ARC

Culling "costly, temporary" solution to limiting human-deer interactions

The most common negative human-deer interactions include garden damage and car accidents

Deer residing throughout the South Island municipalities have recently received attention due to garden damage and car accidents, said Kari Marks, manager of the BC SPCA Wild Animal Rehabilitation Centre in Metchosin.

“BC SPCA Wild ARC is opposed to culling of urban deer when it is inhumane and/or there is no scientific justification for lethal measures,” she said in a release. “Culling is a costly, temporary solution, and Wild ARC instead encourages communities to adopt non-lethal, long-term strategies.

She offers five “simple, humane and effective options.

•Don’t feed the deer. Feeding encourages them to remain in the area, and can create dependency.

•Fence yards. Deer are not likely to jump a fence if they can’t see through it to the other side.

•Install deterrents throughout the property. Motion-activated lights, sprinkler systems and banging pots and pans will all deter deer, who spook easily.

•Landscape with “deer-proof” plants. Deer love to eat narrow-leaf evergreens, daylilies and tulips, among others, and so should be avoided. Instead, plant fragrant, prickly or poisonous  options like daffodils, lavender and rhododendrens in the yard.

•Follow the speed limit, especially during early morning hours or dusk when visibility is low. Respecting traffic laws will result in fewer deer-related accidents.