Fiona Hamersely Chambers at Metchosin Farm

Metchosin Farm venue draws foodies

Annual Feast of Fields returns to the West Shore for annual fall event

The stunning backdrop of four hectares of Metchosin farmland will greet guests to the annual Feast of Fields this fall.

“I love this event,” said Fiona Hamersley Chambers of Metchosin Farm. “As a farmer and a producer this just ties in so well with what I do and love.”

It’s a return to the scene for some long-time Feasters, the venue is a portioned-off parcel of Sea Bluff Farm, which hosted the event in 2000.

“I’m looking forward to seeing what the other chefs and vendors have put together because as a farmer I don’t get to go out that often,”  she said with a laugh. “I commute from my house to the greenhouse and back again.”

The farm and farmer were “broken in” hosting a friend’s wedding and now they’re ready for the influx of up to 600 foodies Sept. 22.

“Feast of Fields likes to highlight the farms around Vancouver Island,” said Jennifer Freeman of  FarmFolk CityFolk which celebrates its 20th anniversary this year. “It’s a very fun and tasty way to support the food security movement.”

Feast of Fields started on Vancouver Island in 1998 and has been held twice in Metchosin, at Sea Bluff and Metchosin Sheep Farm in 2010.

Over the 15 years, FarmFolk CityFolk has donated more than $100,000 back into B.C. communities. Feast proceeds these days are invested in Vancity’s microloan program for local farmers and food producers.

“Food security is often in the hands of private endeavours,” Freeman said. “So by creating the microloan partnership with the (Island Chef’s Collaborative) and Vancity, it helps somebody with the vision and goal to create further food in their community apply for a loan.”

The palatable event features food by Island chefs, farmers and food artisans and is paired with locally produced wines and ales, ciders and mead.

“It’s a great festival atmosphere and you’re with a bunch of like-minded people,” Hamersley Chambers said. “They’re enjoying the fruits of the labour, and stuff tastes so good at these events, I think people are inspired to think about their food.”

Only 600 tickets, at $95 each, are available and can be bought online through farmfolkcityfolk.ca or in person at Cook Culture (1317 Blanshard St.) and must be bought in advance.

“You’re getting out of the city and seeing where your food is coming from,” Freeman said.

 

“It’s also a great way to showcase different businesses that are working hard to support the local food scene.”