Women unnecessarily suffering from heart disease due to lack of research: report

A woman dies of heart disease every 20 minutes in Canada

A new report from the Heart and Stroke Foundation says Canadian women are “unnecessarily suffering and dying from heart disease” because of a system that is ill-equipped to diagnose, treat and support them.

“Heart disease is the leading cause of premature death for women in Canada, yet women’s hearts are still vastly misunderstood,” said foundation CEO Yves Savoie in a report released Thursday.

“It’s shocking that we are so far behind in our understanding of women’s hearts, and that new knowledge is so slow to reach the bedside.”

READ MORE: New app alerts bystanders trained in CPR to nearby cardiac arrests

The report says a woman dies of heart disease in Canada every 20 minutes and are five times more likely to die from heart disease than breast cancer yet two-thirds of heart disease clinical research still focuses on men.

“Women are under-researched, under-diagnosed and under-treated, under-supported and under-aware,” said Savoie. “It’s unacceptable, and the situation has got to change — we need to smash this glass ceiling.”

The foundation said women are more likely than men to die or have a second heart attack within the first six months of a cardiac event and women are less likely to get bypass surgery and stents to restore blood flow.

Savoie said there is a need to “educate and equip health care systems and providers to think about, investigate and treat women’s heart disease differently than they do men’s.”

On the positive side, Savoie said more organizations that fund research are requiring sex and gender to be considered in research proposals and that Canadian researchers are at the forefront of new studies into heart conditions that predominantly affect women.

“Progress has been made recently, but not nearly fast enough to equitably protect women’s hearts,” said Savoie.

“The challenge is to accelerate the pace of change, to gather new knowledge and translate it into better and safer heart healthcare for women.”

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Metchosin moves to regulate short-term vacation rentals

Airbnb operators could be required to have a business licence

Shamrocks have their eye on another Mann Cup

Home opener kicks off the season this Friday in Colwood

Sooke mom threatens legal action against sunscreen company

Caleb Jordan, 6, was covered in blisters 20 minutes after using Banana Boat sunscreen

Mighty garage sale returns to Metchosin

Find everything from household goods to instruments

Victoria man arrested for sexual assault on BC Transit bus

Incident took place downtown, in broad daylight in front of fellow passengers

VIDEO: Tide pool school draws a crowd to explore seaside in Oak Bay

Friends of Uplands Park hosted the inter-tidal exploration at Cattle Point on… Continue reading

Editorial: Amateur sports benefits the entire community

The crack of the bat and the sounds of cheers fill the… Continue reading

Woman’s death near Tofino prompts warning about ‘unpredictable’ ocean

Ann Wittenberg was visiting Tofino for her daughter Victoria Emon’s wedding

B.C. man facing deportation says terror accusation left him traumatized

Othman Hamdan was acquitted of terrorism-related charges by a B.C. Supreme Court judge in September

Will Taylor Swift’s high concert ticket prices stop scalpers?

Move by artist comes as B.C. looks to how to regulate scalpers and bots reselling concert tickets

Saanich councillor says amalgamation motion has ‘failed’

A Saanich councillor has questioned ongoing amalgamation talks with the City of… Continue reading

36 fires sparked May long weekend, most due to lightning: BC Wildfire

As warmer weather nears, chief fire officer Kevin Skrepnek says too soon to forecast summer

Ariana Grande sends message of hope on anniversary of Manchester bombing

Prince William joins survivors and emergency workers for remembrance service

B.C. flood risk switches from snowmelt to rainfall: River Forecast Centre

Kootenays and Fraser River remain serious concerns

Most Read