Even walking the dog could qualify as part of the 150 minutes per week that Canadians are failing to get, according to ParticipACTION. (needpix.com)

Canadians get a D in physical activity: report card

Many Canadians don’t get the 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity per week

How much have you moved today? Likely not enough, according to a ParticipACTION report card released Tuesday.

The non-profit organization assigned a D grade to Canadian adults for how much they move on a given day or week, with most not even coming close to meeting goals for daily movement, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, muscle- and bone-strengthening activities and balance training.

The best category was daily movement, for which the non-report gave a C grade, meaning that 52 per cent of people get at least 7,500 steps per day.

Ryan Rhodes, a professor of health psychology at the University of Victoria, said the 7,500-step goal is replacing the 10,000 one.

The 10,000 goal was adopted from Japan and “was a nice round number,” Rhodes said, but new research suggests that 7,500 steps is likely a better benchmark.

When it came to working up a sweat or getting a bit out of breath, Canadians did poorly.

Only 16 per cent of adults aged 18 to 79 got the weekly recommended 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity, getting an F grade.

Rhodes said there tends to be an “intention gap” when it comes to moderate or vigorous exercise.

“Over 70 per cent of people have good intentions, but not very many people are meeting those intentions,” he said.

“We have these great New Year’s resolutions and then, two weeks later, everyone’s abandoned them.”

Rhodes said it’s not necessary to go to the gym or hike up a mountain to get your 150 minutes. Moderate to vigorous activity just means getting a little out of breath, he said, such as a brisker-than-usual walk.

But people have to get something out of it if they’re going to stick to it.

“When we’re engaging in something like physical activity, we usually start for weight-loss reasons,” he said, adding that people only stick to an exercise plan if they enjoy it.

“Just picking up the pace a little bit may be sufficient to move people into moderate and vigorous categories.”

READ MORE: Dog owners have reduced risk of dying from heart problems, says researcher

READ MORE: Canadians believe physical inactivity is nearly as bad as smoking: study

Just Posted

West Shore students get message on interface fires

Royal Roads University teams up with high school students and Langford Fire

Rickter Scale: Children in the eye of the porn storm

The Rickter Scale is a weekly column

PHOTOS: Trangender flag raised for first time ever outside of B.C. Legislature

Nov. 20 marks Transgender Day of Remembrance, honouring those who have been murdered

Oak Bay ready for 19th annual Light Up

Games, crafts, live music, roasted chestnuts mark Sunday’s Light Up

B.C. politicians view supermodel’s transition journey on Transgender Day

Liberal MLA Jane Thornthwaite and New Democrat MLA Spencer Chandra Herbert appear in the documentary

POLL: Do you plan on making any purchases on Black Friday?

We’ve all seen the images. Shoppers rioting outside of a store in… Continue reading

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers wanted list for the week of Nov. 19

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

B.C. won’t appeal decision protecting ICBC court experts

Change to evidence rules next to save money, David Eby says

1898 Yukon gold rush photo featuring Greta Thunberg look-alike sends internet into tailspin

Jokes erupted this week after a 120-year-old photo taken by Eric A. Hegg surfaced from archives

Distracted driving tickets not for ICBC revenue, B.C. minister says

Minister Mike Farnworth calls SenseBC analysis ‘nonsense’

CN Rail strike and lack of trucking alternatives stoke forest industry fears

Companies calling on the federal government to ‘do everything in its power’ to end the strike

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau unveils new Liberal cabinet

Pivotal role in his new cabinet for a minority-government era goes to Chrystia Freeland

Most Read