Various options available for emergency cell phones

Re: Mountain hiker lucky to be alive after heart attack on Mount Finlayson (Gazette, June 8)

What’s a person to do?

Get rid of your cell phone – which makes a whole lot of sense in light of the just-released $25 million U.S. study showing that wireless radiation causes cancer. But then find yourself alone on Mt. Finlayson suddenly being struck down by a massive heart attack and without a cell phone to call for help.

Well, you can continue relying on the fortuitous appearance and kindness of strangers – or do what a fellow sufferer of a massive heart attack does. I carry a cell phone that is not a cell phone: it’s a special emergency cell phone that doesn’t have a sim card and can only be used for 911 calls.

And I also have an older cell phone, this one with a sim card, but a phone for which I no longer have an active account. Nevertheless, I can call for help with it because all cell phone service providers must allow their former subscribers’ cell phones to connect to 911.  It’s a condition of their license.

It is an aspect of these phones that they are only useful when turned on and are only turned on in emergencies. So it is only in emergencies that wireless radiation is emitted.

And only when that radiation is emitted, as seen in that aforementioned U.S. government study, does it create its own emergencies.

Dennis Noble

Colwood