Tolerance, not acceptance, leads to communication, change

Columnist looks at tolerance issue with narrow focus

Re: I don’t want to be tolerated (Column, Jan. 4)

I see that Charla Huber’s piece was “written in ink.” I hope she doesn’t really believe that status quo should be carved in stone.

Her definition of tolerance is way off-mark and the suggestion we should simply accept things with which we do not agree is crass.

The claim that “tolerating is still enabling people to hate,” ignores completely that it is tolerance, rather than acceptance, which enables communication and change.

Furthermore, she is wrong to suggest that acceptance is everything “if we want to make this world a better place.” History tells the lie to that.

For example, did transported slaves in America,  the French proletariat or the downtrodden British working class give up hope of freedom or justice and simply accept the overwhelming “done deals” that ruled their lives?

If they had, where would democracy be now in those countries?

Rather, it was their tolerance, until the time was right, that made change possible for them. The same is true of Eastern Europe and the Middle East, where although people have had to tolerate evil rule, they have never accepted it just because the odds were stacked against them.

Some of Ms. Huber’s examples are too frivolous for comment (where boxes of crayons, bush-eating deer and Scotch broom come into all this is totally beyond me), but she should be reminded that in the classroom, tolerance and acceptance of every individual student’s needs, whether easy or difficult, are dealt with every day as an integral part of good teaching practice.

Sorry Ms. Huber, although I can tolerate your right to the opinion, I cannot accept that “tolerance” is the poor cousin of “acceptance.” Their relationship has always been, and will forever remain, much closer and interdependent than that.

Derrick Johns

Oak Bay

Just Posted

Greater Victoria teachers experienced more than 30 incidents of violence from students in one month

Shuttered behavioural programs, lack of resources creates challenges for local schools

Esquimalt High robotics team heads to international competition

The Esquimalt Atom Smashers will participate in the FIRST Robotics Canada competition

Canadian alcohol policy gets failing grade from UVic researchers

Canadian provinces and territories collectively achieved less than half of their potential to reduce alcohol related harm

Island playoffs underway at Oak Bay High

Home team vies for fifth straight Island title

Black Press readers share photos of their favourite critters on #LoveYourPetDay

Greater Victoria is raining cats and dogs…and snails and goats

POLL: Will you be wearing pink to take a stand against bullying

Schools and workplaces across Greater Victoria and around the province will be… Continue reading

UPDATE: Man charged in stabbing of woman, off-duty cop outside B.C. elementary school

Manoj George, 49, is facing two counts of aggravated assault and two counts of assault with a weapon after the incident on Wednesday, Feb. 20.

Federal fisheries minister calls for precautionary approach to fish farming

Government still reviewing Federal Court’s decision on PRV – Wilkinson

Why do zebras have stripes? Perhaps to dazzle away flies

Researchers from University of Bristol look into why zebras have stripes

Poll: More voters believe Canada doing worse under Trudeau government

22 per cent believed the country is doing better and 27 per cent said things are the same

HBC shuttering Home Outfitters across Canada

North America’s oldest retailer is revamping its various stores to improve profitability

BC SPCA investigates Okanagan woman with prior animal abuse convictions

BC SPCA is investigating a property near Vernon

Man wanted for sex trafficking, confinement may be heading to B.C.

Kevin Myrthil, 26, is also accused of assault on a 19-year-old woman at an Edmonton hotel

Most Read