Teaching option suggested for working with special students

Teaching assistants with specialized skills offer alternative

Re: Special needs need addressing (Our View, Sept. 24)

I agree with your article about the need for children with learning and behavioural needs requiring extra one-to-one assistance and that moving them out would not be the best solution. I would like to suggest another option that is a win-win for all involved.

If there was a classroom or two in each school dedicated to children with special needs, that was staffed by teacher assistants with specialized training on behaviour management and varied learning needs, the students would have a smaller class size with more one-to-one time.

Teacher assistants are often trained to teach in alternative styles to allow the child to learn in a nonconventional way and their pay is less than a teacher with a degree. Maybe their curriculum is met or they learn more of the things they “need to know to be an active community member.” The children would still be in the same school as their peers and would meet at recess and lunch breaks.

They could most likely join them for music, art, PE or other classes they are able to manage. Our children are all individuals and their learning needs all need to be met, whether they have “special” learning or behavioural needs, or are just struggling in math or reading.

They should all have individual education plans and bureaucracy or school board budgets shouldn’t interfere with their learning. Also, the government is obviously trying to force more families into the private schooling sector. Taxpayers buying into this and suggesting they shouldn’t have to pay school tax should look at the teacher their grandchild is learning from, or the nurse they will eventually come into contact with in their older years, and ask if education is important to them and the community in general?

Laura Johnson

Metchosin

Just Posted

Retiring Oak Bay geriatrics doctor shares his philosophy

‘People are unacquainted with death,’ Dr. David Brook said

Your summer 2019 outdoor movie roundup

Enjoy free outdoor movies in Greater Victoria this summer

International conference to boost Indigenous languages comes to Victoria

Chiefs, politician, academics and Art Napoleon to attend

BC Summer Reading Club is back at the Greater Victoria Public Library

BC Summer Reading Club is back at the Greater Victoria Public Library

WATCH: Thousands gather for National Indigenous Peoples Day at Royal Roads University

Day to embrace and celebrate culture and lives of Indigenous peoples

Wildfire burning in coastal forest

A fire beside the Sea to Sky Highway is burning up a steep slope

PHOTOS: Event marks one year since soccer team rescued from Thai cave

Nine players and coach took part in marathon and bike event to help improve conditions at cave

Rock climber dies after fall at Stawamus Chief in Squamish

The man had fallen about 30 metres while climbing in the Grand Wall area

Five B.C. students taken to hospital after playing with vaping device

School district said students were taken to hospital ‘out of an abundance of caution’

Being a pot dealer is not what it used to be

Sunday Big Read: the business of selling marijuana in B.C. is a slow bureaucratic slog

VIDEO: Two more pride flags have been stolen from Langley woman

Lisa Ebenal was “angry” and “fed up” after the latest theft. Then people started showing suppport

B.C. couple who has raised 58 children turns to community amid cancer diagnosis

Family who raised, fostered and adopted many kids hoping to gain some precious together time to fight cancer

Canucks acquire forward J.T. Miller from Lightning

J.T. Miller, 26, had 13 goals and 34 assists for the Lightning last season

Most Read