Schools need more special need support

My oldest son is 11 years of age and has an intellectual disability

My oldest son is 11 years of age and has an intellectual disability. His diagnosis is moderate to profound cognitive impairment with combined type ADHD. He presently attends John Muir elementary in Sooke. I am an employee of School District No. 62. as an educational assistant and I work with students with special needs and disabilities.

I was informed hours for support with his educational assistant (EA) had been cut to little or no support in the afternoon.

Some of his hours and other students’ support hours were needed in order to support a child with more severe disabilities in kindergarten.

This is unacceptable. I do not blame the teachers or the educators, they are doing the best they can with what they have. But what they have is not enough. Not nearly enough. I am tired of accepting the unacceptable. I am angry and I fear especially for my son that he is not getting the education that he deserves.

Stress, frustration and anxiety levels are increasing in this classroom because my son is not receiving the support he is entitled to. Therefore there are more disruptions and meltdowns occur on a daily basis in this classroom. It is not fair to my son, nor to the teacher, nor to the other students in the classroom.

Classrooms are not supposed to contain more than 22 students. The majority of classrooms exceed those numbers.

Not to mention not more than two special needs or disabled students per classroom, in many cases there are more than that with shared EA support because of limited funding for one-on-one support.

The bottom line is there is not enough money in the budget to support the needs of the students. This problem in our educational system needs to be badly rectified. Multiple schools in the Sooke District are pleading to get more support hours and are not getting them because there is no money in the budget.

Our children, teachers and educators have the right and entitlement to receive and give a quality education.

Laura Wristen





Just Posted

Community rallies behind Langford man battling lymphoma

More than $20,000 has been raised to help Mike Gordon

Career fair inspires Royal Bay students

Inaugural event brought together 72 workers from various fields

U-Bicycle plans to ride into Esquimalt

Dockless bike share service launched last fall in Victoria, aims to spread across CRD

Group calls for limited access to backcountry roads near Jordan River

Victoria Fish and Game Protective Association says closures would limit misuse of woods

Saanich Police speed reader board stolen

Traffic safety device taken from the 4700 block of Interurban Road

Ottawa proposes restricted pot labels, packages

Packaging will include red stop sign with marijuana leaf and ‘THC’

Women’s Expo seeks to empower women this weekend

Victoria Women’s Expo set for Saturday and Sunday at Pearkes Recreation Centre

Rescued Comox canoer credits those ‘at the right place, at the right time’

James Milne was rescued in a hypothermic state Sunday near Goose Spit

Proposed gun bill attacked by gun owners and shooting victims

The federal government tabled the bill today in order to tighten the sale and tracking of firearms

New anti-radicalization centre in the works for B.C.

Centre aims to help ‘vulnerable individuals of the path to radicalization’ before they turn to crime

B.C. bravery, public service honoured by Governor General Julie Payette

UVic basketball coach Kathryn Shields inducted into Order of Canada

Sea lion with rope wrapped around neck saved by Vancouver Aquarium

Steller sea lions are a species of special concern and some populations are endangered in parts of Alaska

B.C. can learn from Washington’s wine industry growth

Winery owner cites importance of industry collaboration

50-million-year-old fossil found in B.C. town makes history

Paleontologist Dr. Bruce Archibald says Princeton, B.C. is becoming famous for giving up rare fossils

Most Read