Pipeline balance sheets tilted toward China, low-wage jobs

Environmentalists' worries over pipelines not frivolous

I read today of stats that contradict the assumptions of Eli W. Fricker (Letters, May 11), who tends to put down the opinions of all environmentalists.

First, the oil companies involved in the pipelines mostly belong to Chinese government companies who will reap the profits.

Secondly, they are planning to submit bids to build the pipelines and bring in temporary foreign workers at less than minimum wage. Very few new jobs will be created (a mere 142 in Kitimat) as we are exporting crude oil, and what new jobs there are will be at the source (Alberta). Meanwhile, of course, Eastern Canada imports oil.

Jobs in fishing and tourism, as well as those of First Nations, are at risk. The only jobs may be in piloting the huge tankers and in cleaning up the spills which are inevitable, given the history.

So, finally, jobs in B.C. will be lost, with no profits to balance this loss.

Christine Johnston

Victoria

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