Our View: Facing the music on STIs

There’s a centuries-old saying about good intentions most people should be familiar with. And while the idea of reducing the spread of sexually transmitted infections is noble, there are a few problems with the plan to let people email their lovers to warn them they could have an STI.

There’s a centuries-old saying about good intentions most people should be familiar with. And while the idea of reducing the spread of sexually transmitted infections is noble, there are a few problems with the plan to let people email their lovers to warn them they could have an STI.

First of all, the rather cute e-cards developed for the B.C. Centre for Disease Control could make some people believe the issue of STIs is not something to take seriously.

This is particularly a concern for young people who are just beginning an active sex life.

The ability to send these e-cards anonymously, with quips about being “screwed” or taken “out of action” is supposed to make it easier for people to warn their lovers to get checked. That’s great if it allows someone to get a diagnosis and be treated before a disease can do irreparable damage. However, there’s a problem if the message some people hear is that transmitting an STI is no big deal because you can anonymously inform your partners after the fact.

Managing intimate relationships has always been tricky territory for men and women. That’s no exception for the current generation of young adults who seem to spend as much time communicating electronically as they do in person. Many older adults find it mind-boggling that some people feel it’s fair to end a relationship by changing your status on Facebook. And maybe it’s a little old-fashioned but we share the belief that some things should be done in person.

Having sex requires a level of maturity and if someone is old enough to be intimate with another person they need to be able to understand the potential consequences of their action. It’s fine to take a shortcut if it saves someone from a lifetime of suffering because of an untreated STI. But let’s not pretend sending an anonymous e-card is the same as taking personal responsibility. The only way to do that is to face the music and talk to your partner (or partners) in person.

Just Posted

Science fair draws best junior scientists from Vancouver Island to Victoria

200 young science enthusiasts share their inventions and discoveries at UVic

Young cyclist struck near Galloping Goose Trail

Minor injuries reported by police

Vic. Symphony, Jeans ‘n Classics will rock you with the Best of Queen

Post-Bohemian Rhapsody, Pops Series concerts bring British band’s music back into spotlight

LOCAL FLAVOUR: Farm Whisperer tackles tough subject of farm succession

Linda Geggie is executive director with CR-FAIR

New Coast Guard ship crashes into Ogden Point breakwater

‘It is fairly unprecedented that it would happen’

VIDEO: Keeping the hope alive, 28 years later

Annual Michael Dunahee Keep the Hope Alive run raised money for Child Find B.C.

Bobrovsky perfect as Blue Jackets blank Canucks 5-0

Vancouver shut out for 10th time this season

Fundraising campaign launched for man caught in SilverStar avalanche

In only two days, the GoFundMe surpassed its $15,000 goal

Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps says future assembly deliberations won’t be closed to public

Reversal comes after Saanich Coun. Judy Brownoff raised concerns

Terror at sea: Helicopter rescues frightened cruise passengers in Norway

The Viking Sky cruise ship was carrying 1,300 passengers and crew when it experienced engine trouble

Search and rescue team helicopters injured climber from B.C. provincial park

A 30-year-old woman suffered a suspected lower-limb fracture in Skaha Bluffs Provincial Park

DOJ: Trump campaign did not co-ordinate with Russia in 2016

Attorney General William Barr said special counsel “does not exonerate” Trump of obstructing justice

Most Read