Christmas has a deeper meaning

As we draw closer to Dec. 25, it’s an appropriate time to discuss how we refer to this time of year.

As we draw closer to Dec. 25, it’s an appropriate time to discuss how we refer to this time of year.

In recent times, as the Western world has become even more ethnically diverse and political correctness has become the rule, the trend has been toward eliminating references to Christmas, as if that will somehow create a more inclusive society. Rather than avoiding the reference, why not use the opportunity of the Christmas season to start conversations about others’ experiences at this time of year?

Rather than being fearful of alienation of others, simply by calling the holiday what it is,  why not make an attempt to develop greater understanding of the various cultural and religious traditions practised in our area?

Many believe the season has become more about commercialism than spiritualism. But Christmastime is still, when all is said and done, more about the feelings people have toward each other than any blatant Christian expression of faith.

Regardless of one’s race or religion, everyone is affected by the marking of Dec. 25. Not only do the vast majority of workers enjoy a day off with pay, many people find themselves in a lighter frame of mind.

Walk down the street the morning of Dec. 25 and you’ll hear far more Merry Christmas salutations than anything else. That’s because it isn’t Hanukkah, or Kwanzaa, Rohatsu or even the winter solstice – Jewish, African-American, Buddhist and pagan anniversaries also celebrated in December.

We’re not sure how many people use the phrases “season’s greetings” and “happy holidays” as a way to be more inclusive, compared to those who are trying to be more PC. Let’s also not forget that such terms have been seized upon by greeting card companies and merchants looking to stretch out the “special occasion” buying season.

People shouldn’t say Merry Christmas if their heart doesn’t tell them to. But we should all try to use the day, and the season, to act more from a place of love than fear, which is something the day’s namesake was trying to teach people in the first place.

Just Posted

Launch party for Vancouver Island’s new soccer team a success

Over 3,000 seats will be added to Westhills Stadium in the next 6 months

View Royal Park sign taken down after glitch redirects to pornographic website

Resident looking to learn more about workout equipment discovered the problem code

Saanich pedestrian incidents reflect recent trends

76% of crashes involving pedestrians happen at intersections

Two people rescued after falling from lifeboat at Ogden Point

Crew members of the Explorer of the Seas cruise ship fell into the water Thursday night

Online blasting video helps ease Sooke residents concerns

Complaints of dust ongoing since 2017

BC Games’ Athletes Corner: What’s your favourite pump up song?

Check out what’s playing in the earbuds of BC Summer Games athletes before they compete

Big-time racing on tap in Langford this month

Western Speedway the place to be for a roaring good time in summer

BC Wildfire update on Okanagan blazes

Watch the media briefing on the current fire situation in the Okanagan.

Zone 6: Rugby star Maggie Banks carries family legacy to BC Games

Shawnigan Lake student and Coquitlam native following her parents to the national program

RCMP help to save goats from wildfire

The fast-approaching wildfire, sparked Thursday, forced the evacuation of five homes

VIDEO: Near drowning captured on popular B.C. river

Search and Rescue manager says the popular pastime of floating in the summer is inherently dangerous

Crosswalk vandalism leaves black mark for Cowichan as B.C. Games begin

Rainbow crosswalk defaced just days after being painted

Photo gallery: BC Games Day 1

A brief look at action from the 2018 BC Summer Games in the Cowichan Valley

UPDATED: Anti-pipeline campers digging in as eviction deadline expires

The City of Burnaby had ordered the Kinder Morgan pipeline protesters out for violating bylaws

Most Read