View Royal resident Kathleen Burton found these box traps in her neighbourhood last month

View Royal resident Kathleen Burton found these box traps in her neighbourhood last month

Another perspective on trapping

View Royal resident offers up some reasons behind need for live traps

Re: More than meets the eye with wildlife traps (Gazette, May 27)

I read with some interest your article about wildlife traps.

I would like to provide you with further information and another perspective on the concerns expressed by Ms. Burton.

The property she refers to is one large shared area of multifamily rental housing (townhouses and apartments) in a large park-like natural setting. In addition to people and their pets, it is home several species of birds, squirrels and raccoons etc.

Despite being asked by the property managers not to feed the wildlife, some residents continue to do so. This has resulted in increasing numbers of raccoons and squirrels who have become bold and exhibit intimidating behaviours.

Some of these animals need to be trapped and relocated if possible and people need to stop feeding them so they can rely on the bounty of nature available to them in the water and on the land here. Raccoons can be vicious when they or their offspring feel threatened. This should be a concern to the residents when these animals travel in groups close to or onto patios.

We are fortunate to be allowed to have pets on this property but all cats and dogs are required to be on leash when outdoors.

If the pet owners follow the rules they shouldn’t need to worry about pets being caught in the traps. I am more concerned that if we don’t reduce the population someone will be attacked, especially a child or senior or even pets on leashes.

Myrna Frizell

View Royal