William Head institution expects to see growth

Plans include more inmates and the possibility of more incarcerated people working outside the prison

Predicting the future of William Head Institution includes more inmates and the possibility of more incarcerated people working outside the prison, says Dave Clouston, deputy warden of William Head Institution.

The facility has space to hold up to 200 inmates at a time, but for the past nine years only about 120 inmates are held at the facility.

“Over the next few years we anticipate an increase in inmates,” Clouston said.

As a federal institution all the offenders have varying sentences spanning from two years to life.

“In minimum security they are usually getting prepared for release,” Clouston said. “They are a lower risk to the community, but that is not to say they are low risk.”

Getting inmates ready for release entails escorted trips into the community for Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous meetings, counseling, family funerals and work experience.

“We are seeking to find more employment opportunities for inmates,” Clouston said.  “So when they get out they can compete for employment.”

The District of Metchosin hired inmates to paint the exterior of the municipal hall in 2010. It was one of the first jobs for inmates, said Clouston.

“They got paid minimum wage which is more money than they make (working) in the prison,” Clouston said.

AA and NA meetings are also offered internally at the facility along with sex offender maintenance and anger management programs.

William Head Institution and federal prisons across the country are working on plans to help aid inmates with mental health needs.

“In our institution offenders need to cook and clean for themselves,” Clouston said explaining the importance of inmates mental health and communication skills.

 

About a quarter of the population at the institution is First Nations. The prison offers the Pathways program teaching traditional native ceremonies including sweat lodges and fasting. A Coast Salish and Nuu-cha-nulth elder both work at the prison.

 

 

Just Posted

Oak Bay realtor recalls sale of home where family was murdered

Home sellers not always required to disclose violent crimes

Victoria police seek witnesses after assault reported by man in wheelchair

Cops hope to speak with witnesses near Yates and Douglas on Jan. 13 between 1:45 and 3:15 p.m.

Olympic Gold medalist rower disppointed Saanich won’t host national training centre

Adam Kreek said also he respects decision by Rowing Canada Aviron

Victoria dancer shares concussion experience in a neuro-diverse performance

Stacey Horton’s Concussion explores living with and recovering from brain injury

Victoria teen with diabetes told ‘no food’ on B.C. Transit bus

B. C. Transit apologizes, saying it will look into food and drink policy

Trudeau says politicians shouldn’t prey on Canadians’ fears

The Prime Minister was speaking at a townhall in Ontario

B.C. chief says they didn’t give up rights for gas pipeline to be built

Hereditary chief: no elected band council or Crown authority has jurisdiction over Wet’suwet’en land

POLL: Should people have to license their cats?

The Victoria Natural History Society has sent letters to 13 municipalities in… Continue reading

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers wanted list for the week of Jan. 15

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Thieves steal thousands from 140 Coast Capital Savings members

Online fraud tactics included phising and ‘brute force’ in November and December

Condo rental bans may be on way out with B.C. empty home tax

Many exemptions to tax, but annual declarations required

UPDATE: B.C. boy, aunt missing for three days

The pair are missing from Kamloops

Daredevil changes game plan to jump broken White Rock pier

Brooke Colby tells council daredevil event would help boost waterfront business

Most Read