Indigenous youth speak to protesters outside of Serious Coffee Wednesday morning. Some spent upwards of 10 hours occupying the office of the Ministry of Energy, Mines & Petroleum Resources on Tuesday in protest of the provincial government’s plans to run the Coastal Gaslink through Wet’suwet’en territory. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)

13 Wet’suwet’en supporters arrested by VicPD

Protesters rallied against Coastal GasLink pipeline

Victoria police arrested 13 people during a demonstration of support for Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs early Wednesday morning after a lengthy occupation of a provincial government building lobby. Indigenous youth activists blocked the entrance to the Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources on Blanshard Street on Tuesday for about 18 hours, starting at 11 a.m. The group was standing in solidarity with hereditary chiefs of Wet’suwet’en First Nation opposing Coastal GasLink, asking that the chiefs’ demands be upheld, observed and respected.

“We are unarmed, they have guns,” protesters yelled the next morning at a meeting outside the Blanshard Street Serious Coffee.

Protesters remained in and around the building through the night and told Victoria News on Wednesday morning that there were many arrests between 1 and 6 a.m. They said they were forcefully removed and had wanted only to peacefully occupy the space.

VicPD confirmed that 12 adults were taken into custody after 15 hours of negotiations. They said the arrests were lawful under the Trespass Act.

“Officers worked with both representatives of the protest group and the Province to find a peaceful resolution to the incident,” said VicPD spokesperson Cameron MacIntyre in a statement. “In the course of the evening, additional protesters arrived outside the building. Officers from Patrol, the Community Services Division, Investigative Services Division and the Integrated Crowd Management Unit attended.”

VicPD said plain clothes community liaison officers listened to and spoke with participants while officers “facilitated access to medicine, food, and water. Officers also assisted parents who arrived to pick up youth who were present at the protest.”

Protesters claimed they were initially denied food but that officers eventually relented.

VicPD said after 15 hours without arrests, the building owner requested to have protesters removed. Officers began arresting participants with the “minimum amount of force.”

Arrests took place over a four-hour period and protesters were escorted to waiting police vehicles. Protesters outside the building “made efforts to impede the lawful arrests,” police said, and surrounded officers who were “pushed and shoved while carrying arrestees to the police vehicles.”

VicPD said there were no injuries and no charges have been sworn.

Sutherland-Wilson said the protesters had decided to stay through the night when “their efforts were met with silence.”

“We wanted a concrete agreement from the ministry that they would demand Horgan to meet with hereditary chiefs,” he said, adding that the premier’s recent offer to send the Minister of Indigenous Relations was “disrespectful.”

“[Horgan is] not treating them like a sovereign Indigenous people who have never ceded their territory,” Sutherland-Wilson said.

“He’s treating them like an inconvenience and painting them in a narrative as dissidents [and] as protesters.”

Hereditary chiefs have taken a stance in conflict with members of the Wet’suwet’en Band Council, some of which support Coastal GasLink – the 670-kilometre pipeline set to run from northeastern B.C. to the LNG Canada’s export facility in Kitimat.

Coastal GasLink has signed agreements with the 20 elected First Nation councils along the pipeline’s proposed path.

READ ALSO: B.C. First Nation hereditary chiefs demand stop-work order against natural gas pipeline

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Indigenous youth speak to protesters outside of Serious Coffee Wednesday morning. Some spent upwards of 10 hours occupying the office of the Ministry of Energy, Mines & Petroleum Resources on Tuesday in protest of the provincial government’s plans to run the Coastal Gaslink through Wet’suwet’en territory. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)

Indigenous youth speak to protesters outside of Serious Coffee Wednesday morning. Some spent upwards of 10 hours occupying the office of the Ministry of Energy, Mines & Petroleum Resources on Tuesday in protest of the provincial government’s plans to run the Coastal Gaslink through Wet’suwet’en territory. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)

Kolin Sutherland-Wilson speaks to protesters outside of Serious Coffee Wednesday morning. Some spent upwards of 10 hours occupying the office of the Ministry of Energy, Mines & Petroleum Resources on Tuesday in protest of the provincial government’s plans to run the Coastal Gaslink through Wet’suwet’en territory. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)

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