People shouted in protest and cheered in joy as the Sir John A. Macdonald statue was removed from Victoria’s City Hall in August 2018. (Black Press Media file photo)

Victoria unlikely to make decisions about Sir John A. Macdonald statue until 2022

A well-attended reconciliation dialogue discussed Macdonald’s history

The City of Victoria now has more direction for how to handle the John A. Macdonald statue debacle, though any moves aren’t expected soon.

On Monday night the city held its forth reconciliation dialogue, with a theme of: Sir John A. Macdonald in Conversation. The night presented a look at Macdonald’s history, from his role as Canada’s first prime minister, to his actions in developing the residential school system.

Its aim was to inform the public of the man’s complicated history, and offered an opportunity for people to suggest what to do with the Sir John A. Macdonald statue that was removed from City Hall in August 2018.

PHOTOS: Hundreds gather at Victoria City Hall after removal of Sir John A. Macdonald Statue

Live actors performed the historical recounting, and afterwards people in attendance were encouraged to ask questions, discuss and put forward suggestions.

More than 350 people attended the event, the busiest turnout to any of the reconciliation dialogues.

“It was an incredibly rich experience,” said Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps. “The key takeaway was that it was quite informative in terms of getting more information and a deeper understanding of Macdonald’s history.”

Suggestions were put forward on sticky notes, which city staff will now collect and discuss.

One reoccurring theme, Helps said, was to slow down on any decisions.

“With everything that’s happening across the country, there are more important things to focus on,” Helps said. “It’s not a time-sensitive issue.”

ALSO READ: Sculptor of John A. Macdonald statue speaks out

She added that discussions will move forward with the City Family – a group comprised of city councillors and representatives of the Esquimalt and Songhees Nations – but not until after the reconciliation dialogues are complete in July.

“The dialogues had their genesis in the statue, so we’ll probably wait until they wrap up, and even then a decision likely won’t be made soon,” Helps said, adding that so far there has been talk of incorporating some kind of artistic component to whatever happens to the statue.

“The issue can be settled by the end of this term [in 2022], but art can’t be rushed.”

To watch a webcast of the fourth reconciliation dialogue visit victoria.ca/reconciliationdialogues.

nicole.crescenzi@vicnews.com

City of VictoriaIndigenous reconcilliation

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Two men arrested after lying about having COVID-19 to stay in AirBnb unit for free

Victoria Police found stolen goods inside the occupied unit

Accent Inns, United Way team up to cover hotel costs for Greater Victoria essential service workers

Hotels for Frontline Workers Fund gives B.C. frontline workers a place to sleep away from their families

Royal BC Museum joins home education trend with outreach programs

Free webinar options available for RBCM@Home and kids’ programs, starting March 31

Victoria councillors propose waiving parkade fees to support essential workers

Motion coming to committee of the whole for consideration

‘The Office’ star John Krasinski offers Some Good News in trying times

‘The human spirit still found a way to break through and blow us all away’

B.C. worker advocate group calls for more sick days, protected medical leave

COVID-19 highlights need for changes to workers legislation: Retail Action Network

Sweet treat helps make workers at Island health care centre feel complete

Girl Guide cookies always in good taste when showing appreciation

New rules issued for B.C. construction projects, work camps for COVID-19

Coastal GasLink, LNG Canada, Trans Mountain and Site C carry on

Order of Canada Vancouver Island musician pens ‘The Ballad of Bonnie Henry’

Qualicum Beach lawyer and saxaphonist Phil Dwyer notes health officer has become a ‘folk hero’

Canada to spend $2B more on procuring medical supplies for COVID-19 fight

Government has signed deals with three companies

World COVID-19 updates: Putin may be exposed; 30,000 prisoners released

Comprehensive news update from around the world as of Tuesday, March 31.

Most Read