The province is exploring changes to the Employment Standards Act that could offer paid leave for employees experiencing domestic violence (File photo)

Victoria councillors endorse idea of paid leave for people experiencing domestic violence

A motion coming this week supports changes to the B.C. Employment Standards Act

Victoria city councillors are endorsing a provincial consideration for paid leave as an option for people experiencing intimate, personal and relationship violence, also known as domestic violence.

Currently, the province is considering amendments to the Employment Standards Act which could create this option.

The idea was originally introduced in 2017, and proposed that employees experiencing domestic violence could request up to 10 days paid leave time, and up to 17 weeks unpaid leave time.

Currently both Ontario and Manitoba follow this protocol.

ALSO READ: B.C. woman gets new trial after judge ‘stereotyped’ domestic violence victims

In a motion put forward by Coun. Ben Isitt, Coun. Jeremy Loveday and Coun. Sarah Potts, the city could endorse the idea of a minimum of five days paid leave to provide economic stability for employees leaving violent relationships in order to keep themselves and their families safe.

ALSO READ: Trans woman hopes funding cut will send message to B.C. rape crisis group

The decision comes after the city opted to “advocate for adequate income and supports to ensure everyone has access to a decent quality of life” in the City’s 2019-2022 Strategic Plan.

Currently, if a B.C. employer is aware that a worker is experiencing domestic violence at home they are expected to help connect them to helpful third-party resources.

nicole.crescenzi@vicnews.com


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