Update: Teens who murdered Kimberly Proctor face adult prison time

A B.C. Supreme Court justice has ruled the two teen boys who raped, tortured and murdered Kimberly Proctor will head to prison as adults.

  • Apr. 4, 2011 11:00 a.m.

The two teen boys who raped



Judge releases names of killers

The teenage killers of Kimberly Proctor will serve mandatory adult sentences of life in prison.

Kruse Wellwood, 17, and Cameron Moffat, 18, were handed matching sentences and their names were released from publication ban in B.C. Supreme Court on Monday.

Both will also serve a five year concurrent sentence for indignity to human remains. Their first opportunity for parole will be in 10 years.

They’re required to submit DNA to criminal databases and will be on the sexual offender registry for life and will never be allowed to possess a restricted firearms.

About 70 people came to the courthouse to hear the verdict, including more than 20 of Proctor’s relatives, many of her high school friends and 10 of the police investigators who worked on the case. The judge’s decision was televised into a second courtroom for the overflow of people who could not make it into the main room.

Speaking to the media outside the courthouse, the victim’s aunt Jo-Anne Landolt said that seeing the offenders in the courtroom brought up rage inside of her.

“I wanted to jump the enclosure and kill them both right there,” she admitted.

However she said at this point, she and her family are trying to find closure.

“If we let what those two monsters did destroy us too, then they’ll have killed more than one person that day,” she said. “Knowing the public is safe from them … at least that’s something.”

The victim’s parents Fred and Lucia thanked police investigators, the public and media who helped bring together the facts for the case.

“I hope they die long, painful deaths,” Fred Proctor said of the killers. “They’re animals.”

Wellwood and Moffat admitted to pre-planning the rape and killing of their classmate on March 18, 2010, and burning her body under a bridge on the Galloping Goose trail the next day.

“In a case as terrible as this one, it’s important not to let revulsion overwhelm the sentencing process,” Justice Robert Johnston said, before laying out the facts that led to his decision to give the teens adult sentences.

Despite the offenders having no previous criminal history, Johnston highlighted their violent pasts and the defiance they routinely showed towards authorities in their homes and at school, as well as the lasting impact of their crime.

“Kimberly Proctor is dead and those who survive her are devastated,” the justice said. “The gulf between this intended killing and normal societal values is enormous and obvious.”

He said it could never be known for certain whether one of the teens was less involved in the most significant acts, but said it’s clear that they were both “full and willing participants.”

He said they will both require significant rehabilitation and if released untreated they would be at a high risk to re-offend.

“We can hope they will take treatment in custody, but that remains to be seen,” he said.

The judge will decide on April 13, after reviewing reports from probation officers, whether Wellwood and Moffat will serve their time in adult prison or remain in the youth custodial facility where they have been held since their June 2010 arrest.

news@goldstreamgazette.com

 

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Victoria Flamenco Festival goes virtual for 2020 event

The show will go online from July 23 to 26

Metchosin bird card project finds its wings

On display at Metchosin ArtPod from July 10 to 12

UVic research team creating virus-resistant washbasins for post-pandemic world

Civil engineer Rishi Gupta hopes basins will be installed in public spaces

Walk for Peace takes a virtual turn for Victoria Hospice

Residents can still register for Gordy Dodd’s 11th annual fundraiser

United Way Greater Victoria launches Hi Neighbour program in Esquimalt

Feedback sought from residents about funding for micro community projects

B.C. accommodators need phone lines to light up as in-province travel given green light

Travel restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic have decimated the tourism and hospitality industries

300 Cache Creek residents on evacuation alert due to flood risk as river rises

Heavy rainfall on Canada Day has river rising steadily, threatening 175 properties

First glimpse of Canada’s true COVID-19 infection rate expected mid-July

At least 105,000 Canadians have tested positive for COVID-19 since the coronavirus was identified

Annual music event in Comox Valley celebrates online instead

Vancouver Island MusicFest holds virtual celebration set for July 10

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Most Read