Signs warning Reay Creek park users not to swim in the pond as a precautionary measure. (Nick Murray/News Staff)

Swimmers splashing in Reay Creek pond advised to stay out until remediation complete

Pond a Class 1 contamination site but only sediment a problem says Transport Canada

Concerns have been raised after swimmers were spotted in the waters of Reay Creek pond, although Transport Canada has tried to allay fears of a health threat to general users of the park.

Remediation efforts are due to begin this month on the portion of creekbed located on Transport Canada-owned Victoria International Airport lands.

The creek was officially registered as contaminated in 2015, during an inspection that indicated high levels of metals, including cadmium, zinc, chromium and lead. It was later given a Class 1 contamination rating and a process was set in motion to conclude with its remediation. A spokesman for Transport Canada says the clean-up is a “priority for the Government of Canada.”

ALSO READ: Reay Creek clean-up to begin near Victoria International Airport

Signs are posted around the park, calling people’s attention to the contaminated sediment in the creek bed. The signs state, “As a precautionary measure park users should avoid contact with bottom sediments.”

Concerns were raised when people were seen splashing in the waters last week during the hot weather. However, while it is not advisable to enter the water, only sections of the creek’s sediment are believed to be contaminated and general park patrons using the trails are not at risk of ill effects.

In a written statement, Transport Canada says, “Because contamination is limited to sediments in portions of Reay Creek and Pond, human exposure to the contamination is unlikely. The Town of Sidney has posted signs along Reay Creek and Reay Creek Pond to avoid contact with the sediments. Public adherence to warning signs should prevent human exposure to contaminants.”

ALSO READ: Sidney’s Reay Creek pond rated class 1 contamination site

Tervita Corp. won the $504,000 contract for remediation work. While work is being done on Transport Canada land, the creek will be diverted and 900 tonnes of bottom sediment will be removed for cleaning or disposal.

The Reay Creek Remediation Project is funded through Canada’s Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, which earmarks funding for the assessment and remediation of federal contaminated sites.



nick.murray@peninsulanewsreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Province rejects criticism from Saanich councillor over McKenzie Interchange

Transportation ministry says project will ‘significantly lower’ greenhouse gas emissions

UPDATE: Father on trial for murder describes being ‘tackled’ and ‘stabbed’ in Oak Bay apartment

Oak Bay father takes stand in his defense for December 2017 deaths of young daughters

Police rule out foul play in death of man found in Saanich

The B.C. Coroners Service will now conduct an investigation

West Shore RCMP snag suspected thief with bait bike

GPS-equipped bike leads police to arrest suspect in Langford

New police force in Surrey must avoid VPD, RCMP errors made in Pickton case: Oppal

Boots are scheduled to be on the ground by spring 2021

POLL: Should there be a ban on gas-powered leaf blowers?

We’ve all heard them, and most likely cursed them under our breath.… Continue reading

Greater Victoria wanted list for the week of Aug. 23

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Striking Western Forest Products workers could lose benefits in September

Union, forest company at odds over Vancouver Island benefit payments as strike enters third month

Conan turns to the Property Brothers for tips on buying Greenland

Jonathan Scott suggests removing glaciers and mountains to bring in ‘more natural light’

Forests minister visits B.C. town hit by multiple mill shutdowns

A third of Mackenzie turns out for rally, not much to cheer about

B.C. sockeye returns drop as official calls 2019 ‘extremely challenging’

Federal government says officials are seeing the same thing off Alaska and Washington state

B.C. music teacher accused of sexual misconduct involving girls

Police believe other victims could be out there after the arrest of Lamar Victor Alviar

Most Read