Arbutus middle school students Lorena Munoz and Aidan Fisher show off some of the colourful bowls the school's art class made to help raise money for at-risk youth in Victoria. The bowls will be sold as part of the Souper Bowls of Hope event

Souper Bowls of Hope returns Nov. 8

The event also includes an auction of celebrity-signed bowls, including ones from Elton John,Cory Monteith and Selena Gomez.

A rainbow of bowls covers a large table in the art room at Arbutus middle school. Handcrafted by Grade 7 and 8 students during the classes’ pottery units, the 63 earthenware dishes have been fired and glazed, and are ready to take home.

But these bowls aren’t going home with the little potters. Instead, all the students are donating their art to the Souper Bowls of Hope fundraiser, which happens Nov. 8 at the Fairmont Empress downtown.

“I think it’s a really neat way to pull community into the classroom,” said art teacher Rachel Liddell. “They learn the procedures and proper steps (of making pottery), but they also contribute to a nice community cause. They don’t have to donate their bowls, but once I explain what they’re helping, they all want to take part.”

Souper Bowls of Hope, now in its 14th year, is a lunchtime fundraiser for the Victoria Youth Empowerment Society.

Hungry supporters (or pottery enthusiasts) are invited to the Empress for a soup lunch catered by hotel staff and Patisserie Daniel. After the meal, diners take home a bowl made by a local student or the South Vancouver Island Potters Guild.

“(Student) involvement means so much because, in the future, they will realize why it is important to give back to your community, wherever they are in the world,” said Souper Bowls organizing committee member Helen Hughes.

All the money raised goes to help fund the Youth Empowerment Society’s summer opportunities program, which helps pay for food, supplies and outings for at-risk youth.

The Souper Bowls event also includes an auction of celebrity-signed bowls, including ones from Elton John, Glee star Cory Monteith (a former Victoria resident) and Selena Gomez.

The Nov. 8 lunch costs $25 and includes the bowl of your choice. Tickets can be purchased at guest services at the Bay Centre and Ivy’s Book Shop (2188 Oak Bay Ave.), or by calling 250-383-3514.

Event details

Souper Bowls of Hope happens Tuesday, Nov. 8, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Palm Court and Crystal Ballroom at the Fairmont Empress (721 Government St.).

For more information, visit souperbowls.com.

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