Residents of Sooke who are living with disabilities are invited to a public forum where they can make their voices heard. (file photo)

Sooke hosts forum to get input from people with disabilities

The province has multiple avenues for input

The Ministry of Social Development will host a community consultation to get feedback from residents with a disability and those who work with them..

The initiative comes in anticipation of the drafting of new provincial laws and policies that will affect people with disabilities.

The ministry’s consultation takes place in conjunction with the Sooke Region Region Communities Health Network and is on Nov. 27, from 1 to 4 p.m at the Sooke Community Hall.

“We are asking for people who actually live with or work with disabilities to take ownership of their issue and contribute to the laws that will affect them,” SRCHN spokesperson, Christine Bossi said.

“People need to feel that their voices have been heard. Often these people do not have a united voice to speak on their behalf and it’s only fair to give them the opportunity to be heard.”

The goal of the province’s public input process is to support people with disabilities and to identify, remove and prevent barriers that impact those people’s everyday lives.

RELATED: Students excluded due to disabilities

In addition to the community meeting, people with disabilities are invited to visit the province’s website at engage.gov.bc.ca/accessibility to learn how they can participate from their own homes. The government has offered an online questionnaire, a virtual town hall, and has invited direct communication by phone or email.

“I think that it’s only appropriate and respectful to allow the people who are living these issues to have their voices heard,” Bossi said.

Community groups, libraries and other organizations can also apply for resources for independent community meetings. Up to $2,000 is available for those groups to host their own conversations and provide feedback.

Organizations, self-advocates and advocates have also been invited to make formal submissions that will be posted to on the provincial website.

Nearly 25 percent of B.C.’s population over the age of 15 lives with some form of disability. That’s more than 926,000 individuals.

The Province has noted that, as the population ages, that number of people with disabilities and the severity of their disabilities are likely to increase.

After the consultation period ends, the B.C. Government will create a summary of all of the the feedback that they’ve received and that summary will be used to inform the development of accessibility legislation for B.C.



mailto:tim.collins@sookenewsmirror.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Two-vehicle crash in Langford sends one to hospital Monday morning

Driver sent to hospital with unspecified injuries

Recent arrests skim surface of Victoria’s human trafficking problem

Port city makes desirable place for traffickers flying under the radar

Victoria Canadian Forces member honored with exceptional Rotary Club award

Capt. Jacqueline Zweng is the Western Canada Ambassador of Wounded Warriors Canada

Oak Bay athletes rule the slopes at Island ski and snowboard series

Oak Bay boys take top ski, snowboard honours

B.C. budget expected to stay the course as economic growth moderates

Finance minister said ICBC costs have affected budget

VIDEO: Ottawa wants quick, peaceful resolution to pipeline protests, Trudeau says

The protests have manifested themselves as blockades on different rail lines across the country

Wet’suwet’en and B.C. government have been talking Aboriginal title for a year

Coastal GasLink says it has agreements with all 20 elected First Nations councils along the 670-kilometre route

Trudeau tightlipped on plan to end protests ‘quickly and peacefully’

The prime minister, who cancelled a two-day trip to Barbados this week to deal with the crisis at home

Canadian standards for coronavirus protection to be reviewed, health agency says

The protocols set out how health workers should protect themselves and their patients

Monday marks one-year anniversary of man missing from Langley

42-year-old B.C. man, Searl Smith, was last seen leaving Langley Memorial Hospital on Feb. 17, 2019

Amtrak warns of delays as railways from Seattle to B.C. blocked by Wet’suwet’en supporters

Coastal GasLink said it’s signed benefits agreements with all 20 elected band councils along pipeline route

Federal emergency group meets on pipeline protests as rail blockades continue

There’s mounting political pressure for Trudeau to put an end to the blockades

VIDEO: Minister reports ‘modest progress’ after blockade talks with First Nation

Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs say Coastal GasLink does not have authority to go through their lands

B.C. man released from quarantined cruise ship in Japan

Because Spencer Fehrenbacher has American citizenship, he was evacuated by the U.S.

Most Read