Saanich Chiropractor Mark Strudwick talks spine health in honour of World Spine Day on Oct. 16. (Michael Dorausch/Flicker)

Save your spine: Saanich chiropractor talks spine health for office workers

World Spine Day is on Oct. 16

If you spend the majority of your day sitting in front of a computer, you may have experienced the tell-tale signs of postural strain – colloquially known as student or office worker syndrome. Back pain, shoulder pain and a sore neck can all be indicators of spending too much time hunched over a desk.

In honour of World Spine Day on Oct. 16, Saanich chiropractor Mark Strudwick sat down to discuss spine health.

Strudwick, who has been practicing in Greater Victoria since 1998, sees folks with postural strain all the time. It started with government employees and now it’s folks from all professions and of varying ages, he noted.

READ ALSO: Saanich woman rediscovers love for husband she couldn’t remember

Sitting in a hunched position while working on a laptop or desktop for prolonged periods of time can result in pain in various parts of the spine as the neck and shoulder muscles curve. Studies show that almost half of office workers experience neck pain caused by poor posture at some point. Looking up can compensate for this as it straightens the neck and back, Strudwick explained, so moving your monitor to eye level is beneficial.

READ ALSO: Saanich teen racks up another award for redesigned spinal probe

Strudwick also recommends sitting upright with the arm, knee and hip joints at 90 degrees. Standing desks can be a good solution for back pain too, he noted.

While sitting ergonomically at work can relieve postural stress, it’s best to avoid working on a computer for any longer than you need to, so Strudwick suggests staying off computers outside of work hours if possible.

The theme for World Spine Day 2019 is “Get spine active!” Folks are encouraged to think of their spines and find ways manage back and neck pain – it can be as simple as taking a stretch break every 20 to 30 minutes at work, going for a walk or seeing a chiropractor, said Strudwick.


@devonscarlett
devon.bidal@saanichnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Trees topped, greenery snatched from Saanich park

‘If everyone took one thing, there’d be nothing left,’ says president of park society

West Shore Parks and Rec offers holiday childcare alternatives

Camps available on days many daycares close

‘Norovirus-like’ outbreak interrupts Bantam hockey showcase in Greater Victoria

Several athletes were sent home, quarantined on the ferry

VIDEO: Boys help rescue Cariboo bear cub

The cub, weighing just 24lbs, has been taken to wildlife sanctuary in Northwest B.C. for the winter

Greater Victoria 2019 holiday craft fair roundup

Get a jump on your holiday shopping

B.C.-born hockey official talks to IIHF about switching European rule book to NHL rules

Rob Shick will represent NHL at 4th World Hockey Forum in Russia

Miller nets winner as Canucks edge Sabres 6-5 in OT

Roussel, Leivo tally two apiece for Vancouver

$578: that’s how much your first distracted driving ticket will cost with recent premium hikes

Over 50 per cent of Canadians admitted to using phone while driving last year, according to study

Kelowna man attempts to steal bait bike from RCMP parking lot

38-year-old Brian Richard Harbison is facing several charges

‘Things haven’t changed enough:’ Ecole Polytechnique anniversary prompts reflection

Fourteen women were fatally shot by a gunman at the Montreal school on Dec. 6, 1989

Bear raids freezer, gorges on Island family’s Christmas baking

Hungry bruin virtually ignored meat and fish, focused, instead, on the sweets

Most Read