Reuse the News: Keep warm

Perhaps one of the most practical and environmentally sustainable ways to recycle newspapers is to use them to help keep our homes warm

Home Depot department supervisor Marshall Taylor holds up a package of cellulose insulation

Perhaps one of the most practical and environmentally sustainable ways to recycle newspapers is to use them to help keep our homes warm.

The main ingredient of cellulose insulation, a commonly used residential insulation, is post-consumer newspaper. You can actually see the bits of newspaper in the insulation.

Marshall Taylor, a department supervisor at the Langford Home Depot,  said cellulose insulation is a particularly good product for insulating hard to reach or hard to fill areas, such as an attic or a wall that is already drywalled. Cellulose insulation can be sprayed into spaces or installed by hand and rake, making it easier to work with than baton insulation.

“Homeowners use a tonne of it,” Taylor said. “We sell, let’s say, 70 bags a week, in our top season. Which is pretty good.”

Another benefit of cellulose insulation is that it’s far safer to handle than pink fibreglass insulation or rock wool insulation. Taylor recommends wearing gloves, safety glasses and a dust mask when working with cellulose insulation, to be safe, but it generally will not cause irritation.

For these reasons, combined with the fact it’s a far more environmentally friendly product than other insulations, cellulose insulation is an easy sell, Taylor said.

“Eighty per cent of the time they’ll choose this one, basically because of the product that it is, of what it’s made out of,” Taylor said. “They’ll generally choose this one more often than not. And I’m happy to offer it. The fact that we have it available is fantastic.”

 

Recycle as a fundraiser

A classic newspaper recycling program brings in big bucks for one West Shore service club.

Paper recycling is the major fundraiser for the West Shore Lions Club.

“We put drop boxes out and the guys volunteer to go around and pick it up and sell it to Cascade Recycling,” said Lloyd Engelking, the club’s secretary treasurer. “It’s one of the major fundraisers.”

The group takes pride in funding scholarships, families in need, the Goldstream Food Bank and Camp Shawnigan.

“The price fluctuates, so it’s hard to predict (how much it raises),” Engelking said. “It usually raises between $10,000 and $12,000 a year.”

Visit e-clubhouse.org/sites/westshorebc for a full list of recycling locations across the West Shore.

 

Just Posted

Metchosin Mayor John Rann welcomes new council members

Half of Metchosin council are incumbents

What to pack in an emergency-preparedness kit for earthquakes

Several earthquakes of Vancouver Island’s West Coast have people wondering how to be ready

Rotating Canada Post strikes begin in Victoria

Monday’s mail will be delayed one day due to strike

West Shore RCMP seizes Camp Namegans’ U-Haul truck

Lock and gate damaged at Thetis Lake Campground in View Royal

Multiple earthquakes off Vancouver Island recorded around the world

Five earthquakes overnight on Oct. 21 were measured as ‘strong’

B.C. sailor surprised by humpback whale playing under her boat

Jodi Klahm-Kozicki said the experience was ‘magical’ near Denman Island

Ovechkin has 4 points as Caps rough up Canucks 5-2

WATCH: Defending champs pick up impressive win in Vancouver

B.C. government moves to tighten resource industry regulations

New superintendent will oversee engineers, biologists, foresters

Election watchdog seeks digitally savvy specialists to zero in on threats

Move follows troublesome evidence of online Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election

More court before Dutch man charged in Amanda Todd case is extradited here

Appeals must be dealt with in Europe, before charges faced in B.C.

Crown says man guilty of B.C. girl’s 1978 murder based on alleged confession

Jury hears details of girl’s 1978 murder while Crown says man should be convicted of girl’s murder based on alleged confession.

BCHL alumni has NHL jersey retired by Anaheim Ducks

Paul Kariya played with the Penticton Vees from 1990-1992

Most Read