The balustrade replacement atop the seawall will follow on the heels of the seawall repair.

Repairs overdue on 100-year-old Dallas Road seawall

Project completion pushed into 2019, extra $895,000 budgeted for rehab work

It’s been more than 100 years since the seawall along Dallas Road was constructed and since that time, it has been battered by the crashing waves from countless storms.

Despite its strength, it’s time for the seawall to get some help. Repair work actually started in 2012 when it was determined that parts of the structure were in serious decline. It continued in 2014 and the projection was for the entire project to be completed by 2016.

But as sections of the wall were opened up, it became clear that the deterioration in the structure was more serious than originally suspected, said City spokesperson Rebecca Penz.

The project has now been extended into 2019 and the City’s latest budget documents show $895,000 is allocated for the work. Despite the poor condition of the wall there are no plans to replace the aging structure, Penz noted.

“Instead it will receive a face lift that involves the stripping away of rotting steel and concrete. The wall is then re-faced with a reinforced concrete panel that is tied into the back part of the old wall.”

Sections of the wall that have been refaced in this manner are visible in the area of Oswego Street where work stopped in 2017.

When complete, the project will deliver a structurally sound seawall that protects the existing road, sidewalk and underground utilities on the affected section of Dallas Road, a section that stretches from the Breakwater parking area to the far east portion of the wall at Lewis Street.

Investigation of the seawall structure have also revealed that repairs are urgently required to the balustrade atop the seawall.

“The existing balustrade is failing and has been bolted to hold portions together,” read the budget report on the project. It went on to say the structure has been painted every two years to reduce rust stains, but a replacement balustrade must be designed and approved. The final design and cost estimates for that portion of the project still require council approval.

All the work on the balustrade, once approved, will still have to be done in conjunction and co-ordination with the CRD’s work on Dallas Road for sewage treatment conveyance piping.

To further complicate the issue, any work on the seawall and balustrade has to take place outside of the region’s winter storm months.

“They have to pull out during the storm months for safety reasons,” explained Penz.

editor@vicnews.com

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