Canada Border Services Agency officers Adam Coultish

No shortage of illegal guns sailing in from U.S.

vessels annually approaching southern Vancouver Island for illegal firearms and drugs, the Canadian Border Services Agency

With only one large inflatable patrol boat to check more than 18,000 privately-owned U.S. vessels annually approaching southern Vancouver Island for illegal firearms and drugs, the Canadian Border Services Agency does a pretty good job.

Rather than complain about not having more than a 9.5-metre rigid hull inflatable vessel, the MV Portcullis, at its disposal, CBSA officers displayed their haul to the media last Friday — 47 illegal firearms and other prohibited weapons, including high-calibre handguns, a U.S. military AR15 assault rifle with several clips of ammunition, switch blades, cans of bear spray designed for use against people, and even brass knuckles attached to a very big knife blade.

There was also a blow-gun, deadly throwing stars and other dangerous weapons.

Not displayed was the large amount of illegal drugs, from cocaine and marijuana to assorted other narcotics outlawed in Canada.

And the marine border services team turned back 404 people, mostly individuals with serious criminal histories.

The Portcullis and the agency’s mobile enforcement team intercept what the border agency calls “inadmissible persons and illegal contraband entering Canada.”

CBSA spokesperson Adam Coultish said those busted risk having their boats and contraband confiscated, but most of those caught don’t lose their pleasure boats when they pay the $1,000 fine per gun or drug violation. The contraband is kept by the border service and then destroyed.

Border service agents have heard all the excuses imaginable, especially people who claim they didn’t know about Canada’s weapons and guns laws, Coultish said.

“But we provide every traveller the opportunity to say if they have them.”

A lot of people don’t tell, but generally act suspicious and cause the marine border agents, well versed in where people hide illegal weapons and contraband, to search for — and find — the illegal drugs and guns.

People who admit they are carrying weapons are generally sent back to their side of the border where they can drop off their weapons before sailing back to Canada, Coultish said.

 

editor@goldstreamgazette.com

 

 

Just Posted

International conference to boost Indigenous languages comes to Victoria

Chiefs, politician, academics and Art Napoleon to attend

BC Summer Reading Club is back at the Greater Victoria Public Library

BC Summer Reading Club is back at the Greater Victoria Public Library

Patriotic al-fresco dining experience returns in Sidney

Dinner en Rouge promises chic dining experience with side of national pride

Greater Victoria region home to four licensed recreational pot retailers

Vancouver Island home to six out of 34 licensed retail outlets across British Columbia

WATCH: Thousands gather for National Indigenous Peoples Day at Royal Roads University

Day to embrace and celebrate culture and lives of Indigenous peoples

PHOTOS: Event marks one year since soccer team rescued from Thai cave

Nine players and coach took part in marathon and bike event to help improve conditions at cave

Rock climber dies after fall at Stawamus Chief in Squamish

The man had fallen about 30 metres while climbing in the Grand Wall area

Five B.C. students taken to hospital after playing with vaping device

School district said students were taken to hospital ‘out of an abundance of caution’

Being a pot dealer is not what it used to be

Sunday Big Read: the business of selling marijuana in B.C. is a slow bureaucratic slog

VIDEO: Two more pride flags have been stolen from Langley woman

Lisa Ebenal was “angry” and “fed up” after the latest theft. Then people started showing suppport

B.C. couple who has raised 58 children turns to community amid cancer diagnosis

Family who raised, fostered and adopted many kids hoping to gain some precious together time to fight cancer

Canucks acquire forward J.T. Miller from Lightning

J.T. Miller, 26, had 13 goals and 34 assists for the Lightning last season

B.C. judge rejects jail time for man with disabilities caught in Creep Catchers sting

Kamloops man Loyd Fawcett engaged online with what turned out to be a member of the vigilante group

Most Read