Jo Stiles from Mountaire Avian Rescue cradles an eagle after its been inspected. Photo by Mike Chouinard/Campbell River Mirror

MARS seeing influx of sick, injured eagles from north part of Vancouver Island

VIDEO: Factors for increase in eagle cases can be anything from lead poisoning to vehicle strikes

The north part of Vancouver Island has also faced on influx of sick or injured eagles since the beginning of January.

The reasons, however, are likely different from the recent case in the Cowichan Valley in which a dozen eagles were brought in after being poisoned.

The factor there seems to be a single source – most likely from chemicals used for euthanizing animals without the animals subsequently being properly disposed. The birds may then eat the carcasses of the animal and be exposed to the toxic chemicals.

The situation for MARS Wildlife Rescue Centre in Merville, between Campbell River and Courtenay, is different. There are a number of different causes for the eagles that have come into the Williams Beach Road operation this month.

RELATED STORY: 12 poisoned eagles found in Cowichan Valley

MARS is a charitable organization that rescues and cares for sick, injured, orphaned or oiled wildlife. Senior caregiver Jo Stiles told the Mirror that of the 18 birds that have been brought into MARS since the beginning of the year, 11 have been eagles. These have come from around the region, such as Hornby Island, Gold River, the Port Hardy area and Campbell River.

“We have seen a number of eagles come in,” she said. “They have come from all over the Island, so we’re not dealing with the same situation they’re dealing with down south.”

Unlike the Cowichan situation, MARS points to a number of causes for the influx of eagles. They tested one eagle brought from Hornby Island that died over the weekend, which showed signs of lead.

“Lead poisoning in eagles happens when the eagles ingest the lead,” she said. “They usually ingest the lead because they ingest a duck or a goose.”

The exact origin is not known. Lead shot is no longer allowed for hunting water birds, Stiles said, but it can be used on uplands birds. As well, some hunters might be using shot illegally on water birds or leftover and rising to the surface in water areas after areas get flooded and later plowed up. The lead might then be eaten by ducks and geese.

“The dabbling ducks and the geese eat them from the ground,” she said.

Again, Stiles cautions they do not know if the lead is being used now, legally or illegally, or if it is old, recently exposed residual lead.

There are other reasons eagles have been brought in, Stiles said, such as sickness or injuries, especially from vehicle strikes. One bird was brought in from the Goose Spit area of Comox with an injured wing, possibly sustained during a wind storm. One eagle in Gold River died from a respiratory infection. Another injured on the Gold River Highway near Campbell River was brought in by a conservation officer after the driver reported the incident. A vehicle is also suspected in another case from Campbell River.

While the causes might be varied, one underlying factor in many cases, Stiles said, is starvation. Without strong salmon runs, the birds are looking to find food anywhere. That might include garbage, which again could be another source of the toxic substances to ingest.

Complicating matters is that eagles have high acidity in their stomachs, meaning what they ingest goes through the system quickly. In some causes, rescuers can induce regurgitation and treat the birds back to health by aggressively using charcoal.

While not unheard of, the number of eagles being brought in is uncommon, Stiles said, adding this is the time of year they get the most eagles, though they do not typically account for more than half the birds. One of the factors tends to be the lack of food, which weakens the birds and exposes them to more threats. For example, sometimes the birds are eating animals at the side of the road, which can then expose them to vehicles.

“Too many birds are trying to live off a landscape this isn’t supporting them,” she said.

READ MORE: MARS launches wildlife tote bag fundraiser

Just Posted

West Shore lands Pan Am Cross Country Cup

Event coming to Westin Bear Mountain Golf Resort Spa in February 2020

Mommy’s Inside Voice: Mourning the loss of friends

Motherhood can take its toll on friendships

Victoria shoppers fund Jubilee hospital cardiac monitoring

More than $40k raised over the holidays at Canadian Tire locations

National Energy Board approves Trans Mountain pipeline again

Next step includes cabinet voting on the controversial expansion

POLL: Will you be wearing pink to take a stand against bullying?

Schools and workplaces across Greater Victoria and around the province will be… Continue reading

B.C. Special Olympics officially underway in Vernon

Athlete’s Oath: “Let me win. But if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt.”

Vancouver Aquarium wants your help to name a baby killer whale

The public helped name Springer’s first calf, Spirit, and is being asked to help with the second

Guards protest firing of fellow officers charged with assault at B.C. prison

Corrections officers demonstrated in Maple Ridge on Friday afternoon

Skier dies at Revelstoke Mountain Resort

Cause of death for young man has not been released

R. Kelly charged with 10 counts of sexual abuse

R&B star has been accused of sexual misconduct involving women and underage girls for years

More sailings coming to 10 BC Ferries’ routes

Transportation Minister Claire Trevena said the sailings were originally cut in 2014

Most Read