File photo. File photo

B.C. woman who harassed mayor ordered to leave town

Repeated unwanted contacts prompts rare probation condition excluding her from city limits

A woman who repeatedly harassed a B.C. mayor over many months, even claiming to be the mayor’s daughter, has been ordered to stay out of the city limits.

Jennifer Alice Danielsen also made phone calls and sent letters and packages containing “rambling and delusional” writing Chilliwack Mayor Sharon Gaetz’s husband, a local doctor, and a local politician who is also a high school principal and close friends with the mayor.

READ: Alleged threats to Chilliwack mayor lead to criminal charges

“There is a suggestion that Miss Danielsen doesn’t get it,” said Crown counsel Jim Barbour in arguing for the banishment. “She considers the mayor to be her mother and going to city hall her right.”

Neither the mayor nor city hall have directly addressed the case up until now, but a spokesperson said in the summer that the matter, which has gone on for more than a year, “has been stressful for everyone involved.”

That stress culminated on June 14 when Danielsen attended city hall, where bail conditions already forbade her from attending, only to tell the person at the front counter that “she wanted to turn herself in to the mayor for murder.”

This caused alarms to go off, even forcing Gaetz into a “chambers lockdown.”

Danielsen never directly threatened the mayor, her lawyer Jayse Reveley pointed out, but the disconcerting contacts over many months despite court orders to stop caused Gaetz serious concern.

It didn’t come up in court, but a likely further cause of stress is that Danielsen often signed her missives “Jenny,” while claiming to be her daughter. Gaetz’s real daughter, Jenna, died in a tragic scooter accident 15 years ago.

Danielsen had also been sending packages and making phone calls to a local doctor over a period of months, leading to a charge of harassment against her. In one letter, she told him that he couldn’t kill babies, but she could.

A psychological report was ordered in June, but she was deemed fit by the court.

In her defence, Reveley said Danielsen may not be certifiable, but she has obsessive-compulsive issues along with acute psychosis that comes and goes. Indeed, on the day she was arrested at city hall, Reveley said she had been having paranoid episodes, went to the hospital where she was seen and discharged, then walked to city hall.

“She attended city hall with the intent of getting arrested,” he said. “There is no suggestion Miss Danielsen is a physical danger to anybody.”

Reveley called the Crown’s position on having her banned from Chilliwack “overbroad,” arguing she has mental health issues that need addressing, and her sole support is her male partner who lives in an apartment in Chilliwack.

Crown argued that the stress and threat to the mayor and city hall staff warranted the no-go, what he called a “protection order” rather than “banishment.”

“A no-go to Chilliwack should not be onerous,” he argued.

In the end, Judge Gurmail Gill agreed. Prior to reading his decision, Danielsen addressed the court with a somewhat cryptic apology, in which she called the case “complicated.”

“I don’t feel totally understood,” she said. “It’s more a lack of family resources than a mental health issue.”

Danielsen has been in custody for 105 days, more than the 90 days asked for by the Crown. She was set to be released Monday afternoon, subject to 18 months’ probation.

In agreeing with Crown’s submissions on the no-go to Chilliwack, Gill dismissed the defence argument that most of the unwanted contacts were done via mail, something she could do from anywhere.

Gill said a ban on entering city limits should give a sense of personal safety and comfort to her victims.

“It at least removes the prospect of a personal confrontation,” he said.


@PeeJayAitch
paul.henderson@theprogress.com

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