B.C. Ambulance and Highlands Fire Department were called to Lone Tree Hill just after 10 a.m. for a rescue of an injured hiker. The steep terrain presented challenges for the rescue. (Keri Coles/News staff)

Injured hiker rescued after fall on steep terrain in Highlands

Trail presents challenges for first responders

A senior has been taken to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries after a fall on steep terrain in the Highlands Saturday.

B.C. Ambulance and Highlands Fire Department were called to Lone Tree Hill just after 10 a.m. for a rope rescue.

A senior hiker, described as “very experienced” by the hiking group she was with, reportedly slipped on mossy rocks while on challenging terrain near the top of the climb. Fortunately, the hiking group was well-prepared and called 9-1-1 with their coordinates.

The steep terrain presented challenges for the rescue.

“We had about 10 to 12 firefighters present,” said Deputy Chief Gregg Fletcher, Highlands Fire Department. “As you could see, the terrain was ridiculous. Luckily, we have the basket on the wheel so we could transport her.”

The woman hurt her left shoulder, complained of back pain and had an open puncture on her left shoulder that was bleeding “pretty profusely.”

ALSO READ: Hiker rescued by SAR after being stranded overnight on B.C. mountain ledge

“Fire and ambulance were able to get it under control before we transported her,” said Fletcher.

It took about an hour to get the rescue team and hikers back down to the parking lot and waiting ambulance, by Fletcher’s estimation.

“The trail overall is not too bad, it is one of the better ones I’ve seen, but the wet moss on the rocks is like a skating rink,” said Fletcher.

The hiking group, Outdoor Club of Victoria, has been hiking locally and around the world, since 1942.

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“It was an unfortunate accident this morning,” said Liz Bicknell, president of Outdoor Club of Victoria, who said injuries are extremely rare in the club. “All I can say is a huge, huge thank you to the fire rescue people and the paramedics. They were astounding, because we were in quite a remote area and it was quite difficult for them to come in.

“The club is very appreciative for what they’ve done.”

Fletcher said the group responded correctly in the situation.

“If something does happen while out hiking, don’t try to get yourself out of that situation. Do what these people did and call us. We will come in and help,” said Fletcher. “These people hike on a regular basis and have even hiked Everest together.

“This was just bad footing.”


 

keri.coles@blackpress.ca

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