Foreign workers sleeping in Alberta Burger King basement

Alberta Health Services said its inspectors found foreign workers sleeping in the basement of the Lethbridge restaurant

A Burger King franchise was issued a public health order because Alberta Health Services said its inspectors found foreign workers were sleeping in the basement of the Lethbridge restaurant.

Burger King said in an emailed statement that it had spoken with the independent owner of the location.

“He has confirmed that the accusations regarding accommodations are not true,” said the company. “However, we will continue to ensure compliance with our high operational standards.”

The Alberta Health Services order, dated Jan. 10, said the inspection found evidence of “sleeping/living accommodations for foreign workers.”

Related: B.C. company struggling to find employees

It said allowing sleeping or living accommodations in a restaurant is a health code violation. Food-handling services must be separated from living quarters and other areas that may be ”incompatible with the safe and sanitary handling of food.”

The restaurant had until Wednesday to remove all mattresses and furniture and ensure people were no longer living or sleeping there. It was also ordered to clean up a basement room flooded by a busted pipe, as well as a storage room full of unused equipment.

Related: Foreign workers say they paid thousands for B.C. jobs that didn’t exist

Alberta Health Services said Wednesday afternoon that the restaurant had done the work and the order was rescinded.

A spokeswoman with Lethbridge police said officers were not investigating possible charges.

Last year, the owners of an Econo Lodge in Red Deer, Alta., were sentenced and fined for exploiting foreign workers. Court heard they housed up to four workers in the same room and charged each $400 per month in rent.

— With files from J.W. Schnarr of The Lethbridge Herald

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Four Grizzlies crack NHL’s central scouting list for 2019

Newhook, Campbell, Bucheler and Berger earn NHL notice

Added webcams give drivers more views of Malahat and highway to Sooke

Five new DriveBC webcams installed in high traffic locations on Vancouver Island

Legend of Victoria dog ‘Cody’ lives on with successful pet drive

Charmaine’s furniture store collecting donations for Victoria Pet Food Bank

Skygazers spot mysterious flaming object during Sunday’s lunar eclipse

University of Victoria astronomer explains the “glowing object”

Evicted UVic student questions Saanich’s housing bylaw

Emma Edmonds had been living with six roommates, while the bylaw states you cannot exceed four

Royals test unbeaten streak on Hockey for Hospitals night

Marty and the Victoria Royals host Hockey for Hospitals night on Feb. 2

Former Blue Jays ace Roy Halladay voted into Baseball Hall of Fame

M’s legend Edgar Martinez, Rivera, Mussina also make the grade

POLL: Do you support a speculation tax on vacant homes in Greater Victoria?

Homeowners have begun to receive letters asking if they should be exempt… Continue reading

Why would the B.C. legislature need a firewood splitter?

First sign of police involvement in investigation of top managers

New Canada Food Guide nixes portion sizes, promotes plant-based proteins

Guide no longer lists milk and dairy products as a distinct food group

Judge annuls hairdresser’s forced marriage to boss’ relative

Woman was told she’d be fired if she didn’t marry boss’s Indian relative so he could immigrate here

Liberals look to make home-buying more affordable for millennials: Morneau

Housing is expected to be a prominent campaign issue ahead of October’s federal election

Cannabis-carrying border crossers could be hit with fines under coming system

Penalties are slated to be in place some time next year

Most Read