Langford’s Kimberly Proctor was the victim of a brutal assault and murder in 2010. (Facebook/Kimberly’s Law)

Family of Langford’s Kimberly Proctor brought back to ‘emotional state’ as her killer applies for day parole

Family member says life is a ‘roller coaster’ since Proctor’s murder

*Warning: some details below are graphic

Family members of a Langford teen who was murdered by two of her peers say they are brought back to an “emotional state” when receiving updates about her killers — the most recent one being that one of them has applied for day parole and will have a hearing in August.

Nine years ago, 18-year-old Kimberly Proctor was sexually assaulted and murdered by 16-year-old Kruse Wellwood and 17-year-old Cameron Moffat.

Earlier in the year, the family heard that Wellwood applied for a day parole hearing to be held in June. Last week, they found out the application was postponed to August.

“Since the notification early this year…it brought my family back to a very bad emotional state,” said Jo-Anne Landolt, Proctor’s aunt. “The past nine years have been very difficult for our family.”

Kimberly’s father, Fred Proctor, put out a statement on Thursdayabout what it has been like dealing with the aftermath of his daughter’s brutal murder.

Mentioning details about the murder, Proctor said during the trial, he told the judge to make all aspects of the case public, including the coroner’s report.

Proctor said he was told Kimberly was tortured, bound and thrown in a deep freezer while alive until she succumbed to asphyxiation.

He said the next day, her body was put in a hockey bag as her murderers took a bus to a trail and lit the body on fire in a ravine.

Calling Wellwood and Moffat sociopaths, Proctor said police told him it was rare to have the two of them in the same vicinity at the same time and committing these acts together.

As of next year, Wellwood and Moffat will have been in jail for 10 years and eligible for parole. Both Landolt and Linda Proctor, Kimberly’s grandmother, said the family is still having a hard time with Kimberly’s death and are always worried about the two men who committed her murder entering the community again.

“Two psychiatrists said they need 25 to 40 years of intense therapy before showing any signs of improvement,” Linda Proctor said. “You can’t tell me they’re getting that in prison, and it certainly hasn’t been 25 years.”

Fred Proctor said the family wanted Wellwood and Moffat to be sentenced as adults.

“The victim’s survivors ultimately serve the life sentences in Canada,” Proctor said. “My wife Lucy struggles with anxiety and depression and sees a therapist for this. She was able to get free of antidepressant meds last year and now this past week has had to go back on them.”

The pain never goes away for the family, Fred said, noting that the family could spend many years attending parole hearings.

“I’m at a loss of what to do now,” Proctor said. “I feel powerless, outrage, disbelief, betrayed by the system.”

Landolt said the family lives with details of the crime committed every day with notifications about hearings and changes delivered to the family at inopportune moments close to birthdays, anniversaries and holidays.

“We’ve had no control of our lives since March 18, 2010,” Landolt said. “This is the roller coaster of our life, the life we now live.”

shalu.mehta@goldstreamgazette.com


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