A pit bull was at the centre of a dog-on-dog attack at Esquimalt Lagoon last week but the chief bylaw officer for the Capital Regional District says there is 'no consideration' being given to any type of pitbull ban and has been seen in other Canadian cities.

A pit bull was at the centre of a dog-on-dog attack at Esquimalt Lagoon last week but the chief bylaw officer for the Capital Regional District says there is 'no consideration' being given to any type of pitbull ban and has been seen in other Canadian cities.

CRD not considering ban on specific dog breeds following attack

An attack at Esquimalt Lagoon in Colwood led to the death of two dogs last week.

An attack at Esquimalt Lagoon last week left two dogs dead, including the instigating pit bull that was later destroyed.

But the Capital Regional District’s chief bylaw officer doesn’t see any reason for Greater Victoria to ban the breed, as has been done in other Canadian cities.

“There’s no consideration for that at all,” Don Brown said. “We get dogs of all breeds that are involved in attacks … Pit bulls sometimes are used as a weapon, but if you simply ban that breed, those people that are so inclined will just get a different kind of dog.”

Such regulations are hard to enforce, he added. “What do you do if a dog’s 50 per cent pit bull, or 25 per cent pit bull? You’re looking at DNA testing. It’s ludicrous, really.”

The March 23 attack that led to the death of two dogs occurred when a pit bull on a leash got away from its owner and went after a nearby shih tzu.

“Don’t trust that the leash is going to be enough to hold. You have to have a good grip on that leash,” Brown said.

The shih tzu’s sibling reportedly jumped in to help and died in the attack. The original dog sustained significant injuries.

Both victims were off-leash in an off-leash area, according to Brown.

The owner of the pit bull surrendered the dog to be euthanized and Brown said it was an easy decision to take this step.

“Once it’s killed another dog and seriously mauled another dog, well there’s no excuse. It was totally unprovoked in a public place.”

Other steps can be taken under different, less serious circumstances, Brown noted. A dog can be labeled as dangerous and the animal’s owner is able to keep them under strict conditions.

Bylaw officers can also seek a consent order, which adds even stricter conditions and allows animal control to seize the dog immediately for euthanization should any of the conditions be broken.

CRD Animal Control, which handles enforcement in all five West Shore municipalities, tends to be busier this time of year due to longer daylight hours and warmer weather.

As for advice in how to avoid situations such as the attacks at Esquimalt Lagoon, Brown said, “People have to be responsible dog owners … know your dog (and) train your dog.”

joel.tansey@goldstreamgazette.com

Be Among The First To Know

Sign up for a free account today, and receive top headlines in your inbox Monday to Saturday.

Sign Up with google Sign Up with facebook

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Reset your password

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

A link has been emailed to you - check your inbox.



Don't have an account? Click here to sign up