Andrew Weaver spoke out at the “Rally For Science” two weeks ago on Government Street. Weaver has since announced he will run for the B.C. Green Party.

Climate scientist running for B.C. Greens in Oak Bay-Gordon Head

Outspoken climate scientist and Oak Bay High grad Andrew Weaver wants to take his skills to the Legislature

Prolific University of Victoria professor, outspoken climate scientist and Oak Bay High grad Andrew Weaver wants to take his skills to the Legislature as a provincial Green Party member.

Weaver is seeking the Green Party of B.C. nomination in Oak Bay-Gordon Head for the May 2013 provincial election.

“By running for the Green Party in the Oak Bay-Gordon Head riding, I have decided to do something I never thought I would do,” said Weaver. “But with a rudderless provincial government and the potential for a landslide NDP victory in the upcoming election, I felt now was the time to get engaged to ensure that the principles of economic, social and environmental sustainability continue to be raised and discussed in the legislative assembly.”

Born and raised in Victoria, Weaver graduated from UVic and spent time studying and working in England, Australia, the U.S. and Quebec, before returning to UVic in 1992.

He is the Canada Research Chair in climate modelling and analysis in the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences and the author of two books on the science of climate change.

“I am excited that we have a candidate of Andrew’s calibre wanting to run for the B.C. Green Party,” said Jane Sterk, leader of the B.C. Greens. “I think that speaks to the maturing of our party and the urgent need to reform both our politics and public policy making. The Green Party represents change, innovation and positive solutions for fixing our economic, social and environmental ills.”

Weaver sits on the CRD Roundtable for the Environment. He previously served on B.C.’s Climate Action Team and is a former chief negotiator and president of the UVic Faculty Association. He is married with two children and has coached soccer in Gordon Head for the last eight years.

B.C. Liberal Ida Chong, the MLA for Oak Bay-Gordon Head and recently appointed minister of aboriginal relations and reconciliation, has held the seat since 1996. She has said she plans to run once again in next year’s election.

editor@oakbaynews.com

 

 

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