Vancouver Island Health Authority chief medical health officer Dr. Richard Stanwick sits in the hearing booth while Albert Guite

Canada’s most comprehensive health survey underway at UVic

Vancouver Island’s chief medical health officer sits inside a soundproof hearing booth with a smile on his face.

Vancouver Island’s chief medical health officer sits inside a soundproof hearing booth with oversized headphones over his ears and a smile on his face.

On Wednesday Dr. Richard Stanwick took a moment to test out the booth as he delightedly toured Statistics Canada’s mobile clinic, on site at the University of Victoria from now until mid-December while hundreds of Victoria and Saanich residents are given extensive medical testing as a part of the country’s most in-depth health study to date.

“It’s really important, not only for giving us a picture of how healthy the population is, but also where we will need to focus our prevention programs,” Stanwick said.

Inside the hearing booth, participants undergo hearing tests – an audiometric evaluation and a distortion product otoacoustic emission test, though not all the work conducted at the mobile clinic is so exotic.

Down the hall, a medical technician draws blood, while one more room over, two lab techs in white coats test the samples. Saanich is the eighth of 16 sites across the country where each day about 10 to 20 residents will visit the mobile clinic for about three hours of testing of blood pressure, skin pigmentation and lung function. Accurate height and weight measurements are also taken on site.

Stats Canada contacted 500 randomly selected respondents aged three to 79 from within Saanich and Victoria. If a person chooses to participate, or allows their child to participate – about 75 to 80 per cent of those contacted generally do – they then have homework to complete.

Participants wear a pedometer during all waking hours for a week and a Stats Can interviewer also sets up an indoor air quality sampling in the participants’ home, as well as a test on their tap water prior to the visit to the mobile clinic.

“A lot of data in the past has been self-reported, but a pedometer doesn’t really lie,” said Albert Guite site manager for the Stats Canada survey.

All results are shared with participants, but remain confidential and used to capture a broad portrait of health in Canada. This, the third cycle of the survey, began in January 2012, and is intended to create baseline data on a number of health concerns, from cardiovascular health and nutritional status, to exposure to environmental contaminants.

“Some of these tests would never be paid for, for a healthy individual,” Stanwick said. “Here, we’re doing a completely holistic approach in picking up undetected disease.”

nnorth@saanichnews.com

 

Just Posted

Local tongue-in-cheek opportunists flog snow huts

‘Executive’ and ‘eco-friendly’ one-bedrooms pop up on Craigslist and Used Victoria

Province urges backcountry adventurers to stay safe this weekend

Search and rescue responded to 28 incidents last Family Day weekend

Snow storms prompt reminders to prepare for emergencies

Province reminds public of essential supplies

Langford could soon be seeing its first retail cannabis store

Clarity Cannabis BC Ltd. gets province’s approval

West Shore fundraiser serves up hope for kids with food allergies

Proceeds assist Oral Immunotherapy Research Program at BC Children’s Hospital

B.C. students win Great Waters Challenge video contest

Video, mural and song about saving the salmon claims the top prize

Eight cases of measles confirmed in Vancouver outbreak

Coastal Health official say the cases stem from the French-language Ecole Jules Verne Secondary

Ontario police field complaints over Amber Alert for missing girl, 11, found dead

Some said the Amber Alert issued late Thursday for Riya Rajkumar disrupted their sleep

Former B.C. premier Gordon Campbell accused of sexual touching

Accuser went to police, interviewed by Britian’s Daily Telegraph

B.C. couple attacked with acid, slashed with knife in Vietnam

Warning, graphic images: Man has burns on 80 per cent of his body, slashed with knife

Northern B.C. First Nation clan says ancient tools found at pipeline work site

Archeologists from the Smithsonian Institute estimate one of the stones found dates back up to 3500 years

Names keep adding to vaccine petition started by B.C. mom

Maple Ridge mom started campaign to make vaccination a condition of attending school

Wilson-Raybould resignation stokes anger, frustration within veterans community

Liberals have had three veterans-affairs ministers — Kent Hehr, Seamus O’Regan and Wilson-Raybould

Most Read