Norm Tesluk

Adopted dogs: never a good gift idea

“It’s not anything that should ever be given on an impulse. If your mother-in-law wants a dog then she should be the one to apply.”

  • Dec. 14, 2011 10:00 a.m.

Shortly after the story of Lisa Atterby’s efforts to rescue cocker spaniels was featured in the News, she had to turn down a prospective buyer. It wasn’t that Atterby didn’t have animals in need of homes. The problem for Atterby was that the dog was being bought to give away as a Christmas present.

“Dogs are a commitment for 12 to 15 years,” Atterby said. “It’s not anything that should ever be given on an impulse. If your mother-in-law wants a dog then she should be the one to apply.”

At Petcetera in Tillicum Centre, where an animal rescue adoption service has been available since July, the rate of adoptions have doubled in the last two weeks as Christmas nears.

“There aren’t really too many requirements that we set,” said manager at large Rachel Davis. “But if we don’t feel comfortable adopting out, we will say no.”

For a flat $400 fee, Petcetera re-homes abandoned, confiscated or stray dogs from Las Vegas, which come to Saanich via a company called Foreclosed Upon Pets Inc.

But it’s not always so straightforward for some animal lovers hoping to make a difference in a dog’s life. Which is why it’s important to look into who you’re buying from when considering the trendy notion of rescuing a pet.

“There are definitely people out there who are just interested in making some finances off of animals, let’s be honest,” said Saanich pound officer Derek Rees, noting that are complications caused because there is no limit on the number of dogs that can legally be imported into Canada.

In the summer, Rees encountered a woman who had imported 15 dogs from Mexico to be sold in Saanich.

“(She) believed she was doing the right thing at the time,” he said. “I bumped into her when she had a total of 20 dogs in her van.”

Penny Stone, branch manager of the B.C. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, agrees that some independent dog importers are not capable of caring for the animals they import, despite their intentions.

“There are some really good reputable breed rescues out there, but there are also the people who aren’t quite prepared,” she said.

While not a huge issue, Stone said, several times per year, the branch receives rescued dogs that have been surrendered by their ill-prepared importers. She suggests prospective owners do some research, including contact the SPCA, to learn more about an individual or organization rescuing animals.

nnorth@saanichnews.com

Healthy dogs, up for adoption at Saanich veterinary service

Pound officer Derek Reese regularly receives complaints from dog owners in Saanich. Many are concerned that required medical certification to bring dogs into Canada is given too freely and that sick dogs may infect local animals with communicable diseases.

“They really don’t present any health risk to local dogs,” said veterinarian Malcolm Macartney, owner of McKenzie Veterinary Services.

Macartney, who works alongside Mexican vets in spay and neuter clinics, does not see any issue with the certification process.

“Most people vaccinate their pets and vaccines do work.”

Macartney has four small street dogs he rescued from Mexico on Nov. 21 available for adoption through McKenzie Veterinary Services. The fee to adopt the dogs is $250 and more information, including photos of the animals, is available at www.mckvets.com.

Just Posted

Retiring Oak Bay geriatrics doctor shares his philosophy

‘People are unacquainted with death,’ Dr. David Brook said

Your summer 2019 outdoor movie roundup

Enjoy free outdoor movies in Greater Victoria this summer

International conference to boost Indigenous languages comes to Victoria

Chiefs, politician, academics and Art Napoleon to attend

BC Summer Reading Club is back at the Greater Victoria Public Library

BC Summer Reading Club is back at the Greater Victoria Public Library

WATCH: Thousands gather for National Indigenous Peoples Day at Royal Roads University

Day to embrace and celebrate culture and lives of Indigenous peoples

Wildfire burning in coastal forest

A fire beside the Sea to Sky Highway is burning up a steep slope

PHOTOS: Event marks one year since soccer team rescued from Thai cave

Nine players and coach took part in marathon and bike event to help improve conditions at cave

Rock climber dies after fall at Stawamus Chief in Squamish

The man had fallen about 30 metres while climbing in the Grand Wall area

Five B.C. students taken to hospital after playing with vaping device

School district said students were taken to hospital ‘out of an abundance of caution’

Being a pot dealer is not what it used to be

Sunday Big Read: the business of selling marijuana in B.C. is a slow bureaucratic slog

VIDEO: Two more pride flags have been stolen from Langley woman

Lisa Ebenal was “angry” and “fed up” after the latest theft. Then people started showing suppport

B.C. couple who has raised 58 children turns to community amid cancer diagnosis

Family who raised, fostered and adopted many kids hoping to gain some precious together time to fight cancer

Canucks acquire forward J.T. Miller from Lightning

J.T. Miller, 26, had 13 goals and 34 assists for the Lightning last season

Most Read