Not all happy with B.C. happy hour

"Happy hour" discounts for alcoholic drinks impose new minimum drink prices that force some outlets to raise their prices

Minimum price for a 12-ounce sleeve of draft beer or cider is $3

The B.C. government has begun allowing “happy hour” discounts for alcoholic drinks, imposing minimum drink prices that force some outlets to raise their prices.

Effective this week, the minimum price for draft beer or cider in B.C. is 25 cents per fluid ounce, which puts a 12-ounce sleeve at $3, a 20-ounce pint at $5 and a 60-ounce jug at $15. Using a one-ounce minimum, the lowest permitted price for any alcoholic drink is $3.

The release of the regulations Friday was greeted with protests from some pubs that were offering drink specials below that price.

The regulations also give licensed restaurants the ability to serve drinks without a food order, although their licence still requires them to offer a full food menu.

The B.C. government’s liquor policy review also levels the field between pubs and restaurants by allowing families with children into pubs at mealtimes.

The B.C. Restaurant and Foodservices Association issued a statement reminding its members that the new rules also allow customers to carry a drink from a lounge to an adjoining restaurant. Licensees are also allowed to transfer small amounts of stock from one to the other if they run out of a particular product.

In a policy directive to industry associations, local governments and police agencies, the government’s Liquor Control and Licensing Branch says the lower price may be applied selectively for “ladies night” specials or “team night” for players in uniform.

Minimum prices do not apply to catered events, or special occasion licences.

 

Just Posted

Victoria-bound plane slides off icy Edmonton runway

Crew, passengers had to disembark via bridge stairs

VIDEO: Hundreds gather in Victoria as part of global Women’s March for equality

‘End Violence Against Women’ march theme for 2019

Victoria’s oldest pipes to be replaced this year

The pipes along Cook Street were installed in 1891 and are made of bricks

Esquimalt needs urgent health care facility, mayor says

A severe doctor shortage is leaving Esquimalt residents scrambling for health care

Almost four of 10 Canadians have unlimited internet data at home

Fifty-four per cent say they telecommute at least sometimes

WATCH: Medieval fighters train in Colwood

Fighters are gearing up for world championships in medieval combat

Want to avoid the speculation tax on your vacant home? Rent it out, Horgan says

Premier John Horgan and Sheila Malcolmson say speculation and vacancy tax addresses homelessness

CONSUMER REPORT: What to buy each month in 2019 to save money

Resolve to buy all of the things you want and need, but pay less money for them

UPDATE: B.C. woman and boy, 6, found safe, RCMP confirm

Roseanne Supernault says both she and her six-year-old nephew are fine and she has contacted police

PHOTOS: Women’s Marches take to the streets across B.C. and beyond

Women and allies marched worldwide protesting violence against women, calling for equality

Anxiety in Alaska as endless aftershocks rattle residents

Seismologists expect the temblors to continue for months, although the frequency has lessened

Women’s March returns across the U.S. amid shutdown and controversy

The original march in 2017, the day after President Donald Trump’s inauguration, drew hundreds of thousands of people

Federal Liberals announce former B.C. MLA as new candidate in byelection

Richard Lee will face off against federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh

Most Read