Earthquake means ‘drop, cover, hold on’

The best way to protect yourself from falling objects in an earthquake is ducking under a desk or sturdy table until one minute after the shaking stops.

Public Safety Minister Shirley Bond and Speaker Bill Barisoff take part in earthquake drill at the B.C. legislature Thursday.

VICTORIA – Standing in a doorway is passé. Running outside takes too long.

The best way to protect yourself from falling objects in an earthquake is ducking under a desk or sturdy table, or crouching and protecting your head from impact until one minute after the shaking stops.

Public Safety Minister Shirley Bond, Speaker Bill Barisoff, MLAs and staff interrupted the legislature session Thursday morning to demonstrate the latest strategy for responding to an earthquake. Schools, government offices and families around the province also participated.

The “Great British Columbia Shakeout” is Canada’s largest earthquake exercise, with more than 500,000 people registered to take part. The drill was also held in Oregon, California and other U.S. states in the Pacific region where faults could produce a major earthquake at any time.

“When an earthquake does occur, the ground will shake and jerk sideways, which creates sudden back-and-forth motions,” said Kelli Kryzanowski, manager of catastrophic planning for Emergency Management BC. “This intense shaking can cause every unsecured object in a room to topple, to fall or even become airborne, and this is when people are most often injured or killed in earthquakes.”

Every year in B.C. there are more than 1,200 earthquakes, mostly small. History suggests there is a 30 per cent chance of a major event hitting the province in the next 50 years.

Home emergency preparedness kits should contain enough food and bottled water for 72 hours, along with a first aid kit, flashlight with extra batteries.

Details are available at www.shakeoutbc.ca

Just Posted

Metchosin driver striking a deer heralds a need for caution

Vehicle incident likely not the last of its kind in Greater Victoria

The rock is no more for Oak Bay ‘Sea Lore’

Council calls for change to controversial location proposed for art installation

Mary Winspear offers out-of-this-world evening with Chris Hadfield

Tickets on sale March 22 for Colonel Chris Hadfield visit May 7

Five highlights in the 2019 federal budget

Latest budget includes a sprinkling of money for voters across a wide spectrum

POLL: When do you think the next major earthquake will hit Vancouver Island?

According to seismologists, Vancouver Island is overdue for a magnitude 7 earthquake.… Continue reading

Greater Victoria Wanted List for the week of March 19

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

View Royal council to discuss proposed 3.5% tax increase tonight

Budget open house to directly precede the council meeting

Facebook to overhaul ad targeting to prevent discrimination

The company is also paying about $5 million to cover plaintiffs’ legal fees and other costs

B.C. mosque part of open-house effort launched in wake of New Zealand shootings

The ‘Visit a Mosque’ campaign aims to combat Islamophobia

‘That’s a load of crap’: Dog poop conspiracy spreads in White Rock

Allegation picked up steam through a Facebook page run by a city councillor

Explosives unit brought in after suspicious boxes left at B.C. RCMP detachment

Nanaimo RCMP issues all clear after packages were found on lawn earlier in the day

2019 BUDGET: As deficit grows, feds spend on job retraining, home incentives

Stronger economy last year delivered unexpected revenue bump of an extra $27.8 billion over six years

Most Read