Musician Chris Ho is coming of age

Affable 23-year-old singer and songwriter releases new album, City of Dust

With the release of a new album

For Chris Ho it is about connection.

Despite the title of his newly released, full-length album City of Dust, and its lead single No Connection, the affable 23-year-old singer and songwriter’s narrative may be more adept at making a connection than his lyrics let on.

“(Chris) balances a very artistic, true, unapologetic creative voice and a really cut-to-the-chase strong pop sound simultaneously,” said album co-producer Sam Weber. “It was (about) the tunes. … Making a record where we really didn’t want to compromise anything from a creative means.”

Weber, a fellow solo artist and member of local band River, met Ho only a year ago but made an instant bond with the young songwriter before coming on as a recording engineer for Ho’s first full-length album. One year later, he is proud and excited not only for the album release, but for audiences to enjoy a precision and honesty that shines both on the stage and in the studio.

“If you go to a live show without knowing the tunes, a (musician) has a long way to go to win you over,” Weber said. “But Chris is able to. (He) makes everyone feel comfortable on an artistic level and an entertaining level. It is without compromise, it is not cheap. He can really grab your attention and maintain it.”

Despite recent success, his rise through the ranks has been a methodical one. Sparked with home recordings shared mostly with friends as a 15-year old, to now having his music streamed on CBC, a spot on an upcoming music documentary Tracks on Tracks, and  appearances in popular events from the Tall Tree Festival in Port Renfrew to North by Northeast in Toronto, he defers credit to the songs, rather than himself.

“I think what stands out is that music becomes something that is bigger than yourself,” Ho said. “It very much comes out of an unconscious process where you are suddenly compelled to write a song and you don’t know what it is going to be about. You almost discover a song rather than write it.”

It may be that selflessness that helps audiences connect with the University of Victoria graduate who feels solace in finally having his 12-song album out there, out of his system and open for interpretation.

“There is a strong feeling of relief because it does feel like you are getting something off your chest a little. … It is kind of like keeping an emotion bottled up. The release of the album (is) the moment you release,” the Saanich resident said. “It is basically (about) having the ability to share a part of yourself. (People) hear it and say your album really helped me get through this. … Or it came at a perfect time in my life because I was going through something similar. It is the magic of how everyone can interpret a song differently and have that be relatable.”

For more information go to chrishomusic.com.

 

 

Just Posted

Premier John Horgan announces improvements to Highway 14

Construction on the $10 million project is set to begin immediately

Upgrades to Millstream overpass to begin Feb. 1

Project includes addition of left hand turn lane onto highway to Victoria

Victoria Grizzlies look to continue hot steak

Team hits the road this weekend before Family Fun Night

Man hospitalized after early morning Sooke Road crash

Police say injuries are non life-threatening

Monster trucks invade Victoria

Traxxas Monster Truck Tour stops at Save-On Foods Memorial Centre this weekend

Ice-cream-eating bear draws controversy

An Alberta Wildlife Park posted a video this week of one of their bears going through a Dairy Queen drive-through

LETTER: The sewage spiral continues in Greater Victoria

My left brain has been trying to digest the news and comments… Continue reading

Fernie, RCMP go to court over city log books in fatal ammonia leak probe

Log books center stage in clashing of investigations between the city and RCMP

Renowned Comox Valley sasquatch researcher passes away

A renowned biologist and leading Canadian sasquatch researcher who called the Comox… Continue reading

B.C.’s biggest pot plant planned for Oliver

Co-founder Tony Holler said the 700,000 sq. ft. facility would produce 100,000 kg of pot per year

Train derails in Northwest B.C.

CN reports no injuries or dangerous goods involved after coal train derailment.

Double-doubles and demonstrations: Employees rally outside Tim Hortons

Protests held in response to Ontario franchise owners cutting employee benefits and breaks

Las Vegas shooter acted alone, exact motive still undetermined: Sheriff

Stephen Paddock was behind the gunfire that killed 58 people including two Canadians

Most Read