Vernon Growing Thunder of the Sioux Nation. (Jean-Francois d’Albret and Cristina de Veer submission)

Yellow Wolf Powwow draws dancers from across Canada

Saanichton event a celebration of Indigenous culture

A fantastic celebration of Indigenous culture took place at the 25th anniversary of the Yellow Wolf Inter-tribal Powwow in Saanichton recently.

ALSO READ: PHOTOS: ȽÁU, WELṈEW̱ tribal school celebrates Indigenous Day with Yellow Wolf Powwow

The two-day event drew participants from across Canada and included some international spectators from France and China. The event was back after a year’s hiatus due to some deaths in main organizer Angel Sampson’s family. Sampson is a community leader who is very active in the Peninsula First Nations, recently helping to hold a Yellow Wolf Powwow at Lau’welnew tribal school’s Indigenous Day celebrations. At that powwow, the children performed dances in beautiful traditional dress while war drummers beat out rhythms and sang songs.

ALSO READ: Province invests $2.7 million in Indigenous teacher education training

The more recent powwow happened Aug. 2 to 4 and included a remembrance service before the festivities began. Over the weekend, four grand entries were made by a parade of dancers, most wearing intricate traditional regalia. Clothed in buck-skin outfits with delicate beading and feathers, the dancers whirled and swayed in front of the audience. The powwow featured a variety of traditional forms including fancy dancers, grass dancer dressed in regalia made of ribbon, and jingle dress dancers with metal cones attached to their clothes.

ALSO READ: Just want to catch the bus from Butchart Gardens? You still have to pay full entry price

Powwows are not traditionally part of Coast Salish culture and Sampson started the event to honour her late mother who was from the NezPerce Nation in Idaho.

The event brought multiple generations and members of different First Nations together. Three dancers who caught the eye were Tommy Little Spruce and his son Leland from Saskatchewan, and Sioux dancer Vernon Growing Thunder who now lives in Duncan.



nick.murray@peninsulanewsreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

First Nations

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Tommy Little Spruce at the Powwow, surrounded by youth dancers. (Jean-Francois d’Albret and Cristina de Veer submission)

Leland Little Spruce in traditional regalia. (Jean-Francois d’Albret and Cristina de Veer submission)

Just Posted

‘Langford Cares’ campaign to cover hotel expenses for frontline health care workers

Initiative gives back to health care staff living on the West Shore

Police watchdog clears West Shore RCMP in altercation that led to man needing 82 staples

The man pretended he had a weapon he would use against the police

Victoria police seek public’s help finding man missing more than a week

Joel Diment 26 and has short brown hair and hazel eyes

Greater Victoria donates 166 tents, 240 sleeping bags and more for those in need

Items placed in 72-hour quarantine before being distributed to help homeless self-isolate

UVic closes Finnerty Gardens and popular dog park Cedar Corner

Regular dog walkers to Cedar Corner sent elsewhere during pandemic

COVID-19: B.C. reports 4 deaths, 25 new cases but only in Vancouver Coastal, Fraser Health

A total of 1,291 people have tested positive for the novel coronavirus

COVID-19: Don’t get away for Easter weekend, Dr. Bonnie Henry warns

John Horgan, Adrian Dix call 130 faith leaders as holidays approach

COVID-19: Trudeau says 30K ventilators on the way; 3.6M Canadians claim benefits

Canada has seen more than 17,000 cases and at least 345 deaths due to COVID-19

Comox spring training cancelled for Snowbirds next month

The team announced that due to ongoing travel restrictions they will not be training in the Valley

Some Cowichan schools to reopen for children of essential-services workers

Cowichan Valley will open 8 elementary schools this week

RCMP call on kids to name latest foal recruits

The baby horses names are to start with the letter ‘S’

Physiotherapists turn to technology to reach patients during COVID-19

Just because services, jobs, and socializing have been put on hold, it… Continue reading

As Canadians return home amid pandemic, border crossings dip to just 5% of usual traffic

Non-commercial land crossing dipped by 95%, air travel dropped by 96 per cent, according to the CBSA

Logan Boulet Effect: Green Shirt Day calls on Canadians to become organ donors

While social distancing, the day also honours the 16 lives lost in the 2018 Humboldt Broncos Crash

Most Read