The Find Your Fit career fair is sponsored by WorkBC and gives students a chance to learn about various careers through interactive stations. (Shalu Mehta/News Staff)

VIDEO: SD62 students find their fit at Belmont Secondary School career fair

Interactive career fair teaches community about job options

Middle school and high school students were given the chance to find their fit at a career day hosted at Belmont Secondary School in Langford.

Find Your Fit, an interactive career fair sponsored by WorkBC, gives students the opportunity to discover different careers in the province like nursing, technology and engineering. Students and parents can also learn about the labour market and get help planning careers or just learning about what classes they should be taking in school.

The fair brought various stations to the Langford high school where students could talk to industry professionals, ask questions and learn about what’s out there.

READ MORE: Career fair inspires Royal Bay students

“Last year we were able to have Find Your Fit at Journey Middle School in Sooke and it was very well received,” said Tanya Larkin, the District career coordinator for SD62. “Families, community, staff and everybody was very happy with what had occurred.”

The fair was hosted at Belmont Secondary on Thursday and Friday and will be going to Edward Milne Community School in Sooke on Monday.

Jodi Robertson, a careers teacher at Belmont Secondary, said being able to think about what classes are needed and plan ahead is very helpful for students. She said the career fair also encourages them to look and see what types of jobs are out there.

“Just exposing them to these different ideas and different careers is just fantastic,” Roberson said. “They might see something today that they hadn’t thought of before.”

READ MORE: VIDEO: Get hired at Black Press Media’s Extreme Education and Career Fair

Ashley Mahovlic, a grade 11 student at Belmont Secondary, already knows she wants to study midwifery in Calgary but she said being able to talk to industry professionals is helpful.

“It’s cool to actually come down and talk to someone who is going to that college or is actually in that field of work,” Mahovlic said.

Mahovlic said she recommends going to every booth and talking to the people there just to learn about what options are available.

Cole Rourke is also a grade 11 student at Belmont Secondary who is interested in pursuing studies in the social sciences. He said the career fair is more interesting than others because it is interactive.

“You actually get to say ‘oh this is the type of stuff you’d be doing’,” Rourke said. “You never know what you’re interested in until you actually try it.”

shalu.mehta@goldstreamgazette.com


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