Victoria’s Great Cloth Diaper Change out to bust misconceptions

Reducing disposable diapers in landfill among goals of initiative

Parents get busy at one of the sites from last year's Great Cloth Diaper Challenge.

On April 21, parents will gather – babies in tow – with a goal to establish a new world record.

Each will pick a quadrant taped on a school room floor, and when the whistle blows, all will change their babies into cloth diapers in unison.

“At the end, everyone lifts up their child to show that the diaper is on,” said Charlotte King-Harris, one of the organizers of the Great Cloth Diaper Change.

No need to wait for a dirty diaper to participate, she assured. “That would be a very poopy room.”

The count has to be handled in an official way to ensure witnesses can make an accurate count of diapers changed, King-Harris said. Data will be submitted to Guinness World Records with the hope of beating last year’s mark of 5,026 cloth diapers changed simultaneously.

This year, 262 sites from 15 countries will host changing stations.

The challenge is a fun way to promote cloth diapers. It’s a subject King-Harris feels strongly about. Disposables are piling up in the landfill, she said. “You feel so guilty knowing that none of it is going to break down.”

With the introduction of flushable liners, cloth diapers “are so simple, they’re so easy,” she said. “There is this misconception that it involves safety pins, and scrubbing poop with your bare hands.”

In May, her co-organizer, Rachel Aube, will be making a pitch to the Capital Regional District to provide $100 reimbursements to parents for choosing cloth diapers to help offset their start-up costs. She predicts the program will save money due to the savings through reduced demands on the landfill.

rholmen@vicnews.com

•Please note, an earlier version of this article incorrectly listed the date as April 19. We apologize for any confusion.

Mark your calendar

On April 21, at 9 a.m., bring your baby to S.J. Willis school (923 Topaz Ave.). Cloth diapers will be provided for the world-record changing challenge to parents who don’t own them.

Cloth-diaper vendors, midwives and doulas will be available to provide information. A donation box will be available for old cloth diapers. Cloth for a Cause will refurbish donated diapers for families in need. For more information, contact victoriaclothdiaperchange@gmail.com or visit www.GreatClothDiaperChange.com.

Just Posted

Community helps fund dreams through Moms and Mentors

West Shore society helps women face the challenges of motherhood

Mainly cloudy skies ahead for Friday

Plus a look ahead at your weekend

Speculation tax forces sale of Oak Bay’s ‘Tulip House’

Bob and Jan Fleming selling their retirement home famous for its thousands of tulips

Province rejects criticism from Saanich councillor over McKenzie Interchange

Transportation ministry says project will ‘significantly lower’ greenhouse gas emissions

Traditional salmon designs brighten Salish Sea Lantern Festival

Children from ȽÁU,WEL,ṈEW̱ tribal school built salmon hats for festival on Sidney waterfront

New police force in Surrey must avoid VPD, RCMP errors made in Pickton case: Oppal

Boots are scheduled to be on the ground by spring 2021

POLL: Should there be a ban on gas-powered leaf blowers?

We’ve all heard them, and most likely cursed them under our breath.… Continue reading

Greater Victoria wanted list for the week of Aug. 23

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Striking Western Forest Products workers could lose benefits in September

Union, forest company at odds over Vancouver Island benefit payments as strike enters third month

Conan turns to the Property Brothers for tips on buying Greenland

Jonathan Scott suggests removing glaciers and mountains to bring in ‘more natural light’

Forests minister visits B.C. town rocked by multiple mill shutdowns

A third of Mackenzie turns out for rally, not much to cheer about

B.C. sockeye returns drop as official calls 2019 ‘extremely challenging’

Federal government says officials are seeing the same thing off Alaska and Washington state

Expanded support to help B.C. youth from care attend university still falling short

Inadequate support, limited awareness and eligibility restrictions some of the existing challenges

Most Read