A freedom-of-information request has revealed a list of creative dog names in the City of White Rock. (File photo)

Pug life: B.C. town boasts waggish list of dog names

Freedom-of-information request lists most ‘pupular’ dog names registered in White Rock

When selecting a name for a dog, perhaps a wise move would be to visualize yourself shouting for the animal in a crowded park.

Or, maybe the owners of Jugz, a White Rock pug, didn’t mind the potential faux-paw.

Jugz is just one of a number of waggish names dog owners came up with in the City of White Rock.

Other names that would pawisbly make one howl include a husky named Haggis MacDuff, a bulldog named Nacho, a miniature pinscher named Mylie Cyrus, a rottweiler named Einstein, a Maremma sheepdog named Miss Kitty, a border collie named Jitterbug, a whippet named Marsha B. Mellow, and a dachshund named Peter Parker – clearly a missed opportunity for Peter Barker.

There is also a golden retriever registered in the city named Santa – one can only assume his last name is Paws.

READ ALSO: White Rock dog poop conspiracy picks up steam

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The dog names are listed on a freedom-of-information request recently released by the City of White Rock. The FOI request fetched more than 800 names, with the most pawpular being Charlie, Coco, Bella, Lucy and Maggie.

Labrador breeds appear most frequently on the list, with about 95 registered, then poodles with 48, terriers with 45, shih tzus, 36, collies and chihuahuas with 32 each, golden retrievers, 29, pitbulls and German shepherds with 20 each and rottweilers with 10.

The list also identifies four dogs that have been classified as dangerous by the city.

A dog is classified as dangerous in the city after it has bitten a person or animal, has aggressively pursued a person or animal, or has been found to be dangerous or aggressive by bylaw animal control officers.

Dogs determined to be aggressive include a bulldog named Forrest, a great Dane cross named Maggie, a Labrador retriever cross named Mungo, and a presa canario named Sunny.



aaron.hinks@peacearchnews.com

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