Tsawout First Nation fisheries staff came together with the community to clean up the Tseycum and Tsawout beaches on Friday (April 22) and host a treasure hunt of Salish Sea species. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)

Tsawout First Nation fisheries staff came together with the community to clean up the Tseycum and Tsawout beaches on Friday (April 22) and host a treasure hunt of Salish Sea species. (Megan Atkins-Baker/News Staff)

Peninsula First Nations lead beach cleanup as part of Earth Day celebration

Caring for the earth, stewarding the land important, say Tsawout, Tseycum leaders

Tsawout First Nation fisheries staff came together with the community to clean up the Tseycum and Tsawout beaches in the spirit of Earth Day.

Fisheries technician Jodi Rooke said it was great to see a large turnout for the beach clean ups on Friday (April 22).

“We thought this was a great opportunity to get the community together, use some manpower and clean up garbage off the beach to keep our aquatic life growing.”

If we take care of the planet the planet will take care of us, Rooke said.

A treasure hunt of Salish Sea species also took place to teach everyone involved about the importance of protecting marine species and the ecosystems in which they live.

Tseycum Chief Tanya Jimmy also spoke of the importance of caring for the earth, to be stewards of the land and to share success stories of the journey undertaken to protect the land and the Salish Sea.

After the beach cleanup, a lunch took place at the community hall where 14 information tables showcased the partnerships developed in building the Tseycum marine stewardship department. Parks Canada, Ocean Network Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada were among those present with information on how to protect the environment and join forces with Indigenous communities to further uplift environmental stewardship.

ALSO READ: New Tsawout Nation fishing boat blessed in ceremony on Saanich Peninsula


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