Langford FD’s Harley raffle to help muscular dystrophy patients

Sixty years since firefighters first raised money for MD

Langford Deputy Fire Chief Kerry Zado poses with the Harley Fatboy being raffled off to help muscular dystrophy sufferers.

There are only six weeks left for the chance to buy a Harley Davidson for $20.

For an eighth summer, Langford Fire Department is raffling off a motorcycle to raise money for Muscular Dystrophy Canada. The prize is a 2014 Harley Davidson Fatboy, and with only 3,000 tickets being printed, the odds are pretty darn good.

“It’s better odds than the lottery,” says Deputy Fire Chief Kerry Zado.

He and other firefighters have been taking the bike around to car shows and swap meets, showing off the shiny chrome and selling tickets. Their hope is to sell out well before the Aug. 17 draw.

“We have to purchase the bike,” he says. “Steve Drane Harley Davidson gives us as good a deal as he can, and he covers the cost of insurance to transport the bike (to different venues).” But the bike still costs, so the more tickets they sell, the more goes to the cause.

Zado says the money is used “to fund research, client services and education, and medical equipment to make the lives of people with muscular dystrophy a little more comfortable.”

Firefighters have been fundraising since 1954 to help those battling the disease, he says. It all started when a firefighter needed help to fund medical equipment for his son. The father and a neighbour went door to door to fundraise and it took off from there.

“It’s the charity of choice for firefighters all across Canada, as well as the burn unit,” Zado says. “We’re recognizing 60 years (this year) in partnership with muscular dystrophy.”

The disease can affect anybody at anytime and isn’t, as many people think, strictly a childhood disease. Many forms of MD affect adults as well, male and female alike. It’s a wasting disorder, with the muscles of the body – including the diaphragm and heart – deteriorating over time. This usually leads to fatal breathing and heart complications.

“Oxygen therapy is probably the most common way to help. It doesn’t really slow down the process, but it helps them breathe and live longer,” Zado says.

There aren’t really any treatment options beyond oxygen, but there are several drugs undergoing trials. For those living with MD, medical advancements and the research behind them are vitally important. For Zado, who’s been fundraising for 25 years, the Harley Davidson raffle presents an opportunity to contribute a substantial amount to the cause.

“We’re about one third sold,” he says regarding ticket sales so far.

They’re available right up until the draw the afternoon of Aug. 17 at the Goldstream Auto Show. Buy them at the Langford fire halls or at Steve Drane Harley Davidson.   For more information, contact Zado at winafatboy@gmail.com.

editor@goldstreamgazette.com

Just Posted

Multi-vehicle crash along the Malahat leaves traffic crawling

Southbound lane heavily delayed at Malahat Summit

Victoria Wolves are in the midst of their best season ever

Wolves aiming for national championships in Nanaimo

Environment plan to be completed on proposed rock quarry

O.K. Industries sends letter to Highlands, local association

Juan de Fuca teams dominate provincial play

Peewee A1 Whalers win second consecutive provincial championship

SYMPHONY SPLASH: Movie music keeps things fun at Splash

Victoria Symphony event is far more than just a classical music concert

BC Games: Day 3 wrap and closing ceremonies

The torch in the Cowichan Valley has been extinguished as Fort St. John gets ready to host the 2020 BC Winter Games

Royal Canadian Navy announces leadership changes in Esquimalt

Commodore Angus Topshee new commander of Canadian Fleet Pacific, naval reserve also gets new leader

Police confirm girl, 8 others injured in Toronto shooting; shooter dead

Paramedics said many of the victims in Danforth, including a child, were rushed to trauma centres

Why do they do it? Coaches guide kids to wins, personal bests at the BC Games

Behind the 2,300 B.C. athletes are the 450 coaches who dedicate time to help train, compete

Government sets full-time salary range for Justin Trudeau’s nanny

At its top range, the order works out to a rate of $21.79 per hour, assuming a 40-hour work week

Lower Mainland teams battle for baseball gold at BC Games

Vancouver Coastal squeaked out a 3-2 win against Fraser Valley

The Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw people signed an agreement-in-principle with the B.C. government

The signing ceremony, at the Eliza Archie Memorial School, was 25 years in the making

Canada to resettle dozens of White Helmets and their families from Syria

There are fears the volunteers would become a target for government troops

Most Read