Tracey Monaghan and her seven-year-old son Ethan of Highlands feel the splash of a trout soon dumped into Lake Ida Ann in Langford.

Tracey Monaghan and her seven-year-old son Ethan of Highlands feel the splash of a trout soon dumped into Lake Ida Ann in Langford.

Ida Ann flush with fish

Another 150 rainbow trout are now calling Lake Ida Ann home, until they get caught that is.

Fish culturalists from the Vancouver Island trout hatchery brought the catchable fish to help with the lake stocking program. The small lake on Treanor Avnenue and Ashley Place is designated as an urban fishing hole as part of the Fishing in the City program.

“We are trying to promote fishing in the backyard. It’s not hard to come here,” said Verna Cameron, senior fish culturalist. “I like my rainbow trout grilled on the barbecue with salt and pepper.”

A Grade 1 class from nearby Lakewood elementary school helped release the 360-gram fish into water.

“It’s exciting for the kids,” said Sandi Marshall, a Grade 1 teacher. “Before this I don’t think the kids even knew they could fish here. It’s convenient and it’s smack dab in the middle of their community.”

While mother of two Tracey Monaghan takes her family ocean fishing, after learning about urban fishing at Lake Ida Ann, they will start lake fishing too, she said.

“Fishing is good for kids. Everything is so electronic now, fishing get the kids outside,”

Monaghan said.

Starting in May. a learn-to-fish program is being offered to teach youth and family how to fish and fishing ethics. The program will be held twice a month from May to August.

“Fishing together can help make a close knit family unit. It also gets kids outside caring for the environment,” Cameron said. “The kids love learning about how to catch fish. Anyone can get set up with a rod and get for under $20.”

The lake is generally stocked four times a year, twice in the spring and twice in the fall. This stocking consisted of some fish left over from the fall release, said Cameron.

“Fish need clear cool water,” Cameron said. “That’s why we don’t stock in the summer, due to the high temperatures.”

The learn to fish program is a partnership between the City of Langford, The Freshwater Fisheries Society of B.C., the ministry of natural resource operations and Haig-Brown fly fishing association.

The program was offered in Langford in 2008, but was only here for the year. The Learn to Fish programs are offered on the Mainland and in the Interior and have been very successful, Cameron said.

For more information on the learn-to-fish program contact the Vancouver Island trout hatchery at 1-250-746-5180.

reporter@goldstreamgazette.com