EDITORIAL: Future pathways seem uncertain

Funding cuts are part of a sad financial reality today

Soon a successful program that has provided a place of comfort, a chance to build life and employment skills and hope for moving forward in an employment based world, will close its doors.

The Pathway Project, overseen by WorkLink – the local employment skills office for the province’s WorkBC program – is a victim of government funding cuts. As its outgoing co-ordinator can attest, its absence will be noted by the at-risk youth who have come through its doors in recent times and over the past 13 years.

At the same time, the West Shore and WorkLink have welcomed a newcomer to the employment skill-and self-esteem building crowd, Bridges for Women.

The 26-year-old Victoria-based organization has long served women from the West Shore and as far away as Sooke, who have suffered abuse and/or trauma in their lives and are looking for signs of hope to move on with their lives in a emotionally healthy way.

Both programs are designed to give people who may have been dealt a lousy set of cards in life, and those who may have made some unhealthy choices in past, a hand up rather than a handout.

We like that approach, since it helps people take responsibility for their own well-being while also teaching them there are people who really do care what happens to them.

The difficult thing about good organizations that count on government funding or private donations to survive is they are only one or two funding cuts away from extinction.

It’s not so different from individuals who are one or two paycheques away from being homeless.

We hope the services provided by the Pathway Project will be taken on by some other organization. It may be difficult to find one whose staff care as much for their clients as these folks do, but the main goal is to avoid having young people fall through the cracks and take the wrong path in life.

Just Posted

Island Corridor Foundation optimistic about restoring rail service

If green-lighted, first priority would be Langford to Victoria route

Firefighters rescue horse stuck in Saanich mud

‘It happens more often than you’d think,’ says deputy chief

Esquimalt senior’s complex getting redeveloped

The Esquimalt Lions Lodge is one of the projects to receive funding for affordable housing

Students schooled on West Shore RCMP

Presentations cover different elements of policing

Passenger passes out on a bus in Sooke

Man was revived and was alert and coherent

People flocking to Vancouver Island city to see hundreds of sea lions

Each year the combination of Steller and California sea lions take over Cowichan Bay

Humans reshaping evolutionary history of species around the globe: paper

University of British Columbia researcher had the paper published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society

Toronto ‘carding’ activist Desmond Cole stopped by police in Vancouver

Cole says his experience reveals what daily life is like for black and Indigenous residents

Dog psychic can help Vancouver Islanders better connect with their pets

Michele Wonnacott hosts one-day seminar in Nanaimo on Saturday, Nov. 17

Commercial trucks banned from left lane of Coquihalla

B.C.’s Ministry of Transportation has introduced a new program that hopes to prevent accidents and closures on the Coquihalla Highway.

B.C. on track to record same number of overdose deaths as last year

128 people died of overdoses in September, bringing the total to more than 1,100 so far in 2018

Cowichan school district defends lack of notice to parents following elementary student arrest

Officials with School District 79 stand by their decision not to send out an alert.

Canadians more prepared for weather disaster than financial one: poll

RBC recommends people check their bank app as often as the weather app

B.C. dog owner sues after pet killed in beaver trap

A Kamloops man is suing the operator of a trapline north of the city after his dog died

Most Read